About the Burdekin

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Find out about the Burdekin Shire.  What it has to offer, what there is to do and see, where to visit and how to explore our beautiful part of Queensland. Discover our heritage and how the Burdekin has grown to offer our residents and our visitors a truly amazing experience full of shopping, fishing, farming and relaxing.

  • Burdekin Bridge "50" Year Celebration

    Burdekin History and Heritage

    The Burdekin Shire has a solid history of progress and development, and an exciting future in a changing world. It was water, good soil and relatively easy access that attracted the first settlers to the district, and those attributes will undoubtly assure its future. (expert: Senator the Hon Ian MacDonald).

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    The Burdekin Shire has a solid history of progress and development, and an exciting future in a changing world.  It was water, good soil and relatively easy access that attracted the first settlers to the district, and those attributes will undoubtly assure its future. (expert: Senator the Hon Ian MacDonald).

  • Burdekin Location Map.

    Burdekin Regional Profile

    The main towns of Ayr and Home Hill are just 12km apart linked by the landmark Burdekin River Bridge – the longest bridge of its type in Australia.

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    The shire’s main towns of Ayr and Home Hill are just 12km apart and are linked by the landmark Burdekin River Bridge – the longest bridge of its type in Australia. A CBD revitalisation scheme injected new life and beauty into Ayr and Home Hill, with new footpaths, shade structures, trees, gardens, public art works and rest points. Both towns make great stopover points, with their ease of parking, relaxed pace, good cafes and speciality shops.

    Apart from its relaxed lifestyle, the Burdekin is famous for its fantastic fishing, unspoilt beaches and spectacular wetlands. Drop into the Visitor Information Centres at Ayr and Home Hill for more information on these and other attractions.

    Area

    5053 sq kms.

    Location

    Latitude 19 degrees South

    Regional Profile Reports

    Generate an up to date regional profile at the Queensland Office of Economic and Statistical Research web site.

    This profile will provide residents, businesses and visitors with up-to-date statistical information on the Burdekin Shire.

  • BurdekinShireCouncilCoatOfArms

    Coat of Arms

    The Burdekin Shire was granted Letters Patent by the College of Arms in London with the result that the Shire has its own Coat of Arms.

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    History

    The Burdekin Shire has been granted Letters Patent by the College of Arms in London with the result that the Shire has its own Coat of Arms.

    The first approach to the College of Arms for a Grant of Arms for the Shire was made early in 1987 at which time the Somerset Herald, Thomas Woodcock Esq., provided details of what actions would be necessary on the part of the Council and what information the Council would need to provide.

    In short, it was necessary to provide a brief history of the Council from the time when it was first established as a Divisional Board in 1888. It was also necessary to provide the College with copies of the Government Gazettes setting up the Divisional Board in 1888, changing it to a Local Authority in 1903, and the changing of the Shire’s name in 1982. All of the necessary documents were obtained with assistance from the Department of Local Government.

    The Council was asked to provide information about flora and fauna and to suggest what factors should be taken into account in the design of the Shield, the Crest and the Badge. The Council was also given an opportunity to submit a draft design for the Coat of Arms, which was fairly accepted by the College with the final product being a modified version of the design submitted.

    The Coat of Arms can be described as follows:

    The Shield

    The background of green symbolises that this is an agricultural district. The ribbon of blue down the centre represents the river which is the largest single feature of the district and the underground water supply upon which the district is so reliant.

    Ribbons of white each side of the blue represent the sands of the river and our beaches. The twin masks comedy and tragedy symbolise the Arts and a set of masks each side of the river represents the twin towns of Ayr and Home Hill.

    The knight’s helmet with adornments on top of the Shield is a necessary feature of every Coat of Arms.

    The Crest

    The white Owl symbolises education and knowledge.  The Council had originally suggested a book as this symbol, but was advised that the use of a book in Grant of Arms has not been allowed for quite some time.  The sticks of sugar cane held in the Owl’s talons represent the main crop and industry of the district.

    The Motto

    The motto of “WATER-ENDEAVOUR-PROSPERITY” means that by the use of our abundant underground water supply, and with a great deal of endeavour, we can and do achieve prosperity.

    The Bearers

    In the selection of bearers a decision was made to endeavour to use something with a close association with our district and the final decision was the White Sea Eagle, which is a majestic bird often seen along our beaches and around local saltwater creeks. The Barramundi held in one talon of each eagle symbolises another popular feature of the area.

    Usage of the Coat of Arms

    The Coat of Arms can be used only by the Council or with the approval of the Council in association with projects with which the Council is closely involved. The Council has used the Coat of Arms on letterheads and advertising, some in full colour and some in black and white. It is also being used by the Council on important official documents.

  • CBD2 Upgrade Queen Street

    Economic & Community Development

    The function of improving the local economy through encouragement of industry, employment, tourism and regional development.

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    The function of improving the local economy through encouragement of industry, employment, tourism and regional development.

  • Images of the Burdekin

    View online the Burdekin Library Catalogue of more than 150 images from the Burdekin Region.  Burdekin Library catalogue To find images search a "key" word i.e. Burdekin Bridge, Brandon Post Office, Floods etc

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    View online the Burdekin Library Catalogue of more than 150 images from the Burdekin Region. 

    Burdekin Library catalogue

    To find images search a “key” word i.e. Burdekin Bridge, Brandon Post Office, Floods etc

  • Weather Logo

    Local Climate and Weather

    Queensland Weather Warnings
    Ayr Local Weather Summary
    BOM - Current Cyclones
    BOM - Queensland Marine Wind Forecast
    BOM - Herbert and Lower Burdekin Forecast
    BOM - Seven day forecast for Ayr
    The Burdekin Region has a tropical climate, with generally hot and humid summers and milder, drier winters.

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    The Burdekin Region has a tropical climate, with generally hot and humid summers and milder, drier winters.

    Seasons

    The Region is characterised by two seasons – the green (or wet) tropical summer season, which begins about November and ends about May, and the dry winter season.

    Being a monsoonal climate, most rainfall occurs between January and March.

    The cyclone season is normally confined to between December and April.

    Marine Stinger Season

    The Dangerous Marine Stinger season typically runs from November to May (subject to seasonal variability).

    Temperatures

    The Burdekin region has fairly uniform temperatures throughout the year.

    Typical daytime temperatures range from 14-26C (52-78F) in mid-Winter/dry season, and 24-33C (75-91F) in mid-Summer/wet season.

    For current weather observations and reports for the Burdekin Area, visit the Bureau of Meteorology website.

    More Information

    View additional information about the weather for the Lower Burdekin region at the following web sites.

    Bureau of Meteorology

    The official Australian Government weather information.

    Weather Zone

    Detailed summary of the current and forecast weather.

    Elders Weather

    Weather.com.au

    A simple weather information site.

  • Population of the Burdekin Shire

    Australian Bureau of Statistics as at June 30, 2007, Census figures indicate the population of the Burdekin Shire to be 18,192 people.

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    Australian Bureau of Statistics as at June 30, 2011, Census figures indicate the population of the Burdekin Shire to be 17,784 people.

    Estimated Populations of towns in Burdekin Shire (ABS 2011 Census):

    Ayr – 8883
    Home Hill – 3023
    Brandon – 1270
    Giru – 628
    Clare – 310
    Millaroo – 200
    Alva Beach – 212
    Airville – 291
    Fredericksfield – 295
    Inkerman – 364
    Jarvisfield – 525
    McDesme – 271
    Mt Kelly – 406
    Osborne – 338

  • Home Hill Comfort Stop

    Visitor Information

    Just an hour’s drive south of Townsville, you can discover the friendly residents and laid-back atmosphere of the Burdekin - Sugar capital of Australia.

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    Just an hour’s drive south of Townsville, you can discover the friendly residents and laid-back atmosphere of the Burdekin. The Burdekin district is the sugar capital of Australia and is one of the most prosperous rural communities in the country. The shire’s two main towns of Ayr and Home Hill make great stopover points, with their tree-lined main streets, ease of parking, great cafes and restaurants, host of specialty stores, shady parks and excellent public amenities.

    Ayr and Home Hill lie just 12km apart and are linked by the landmark Burdekin River Bridge. Also known as the Silver Link, the 1103 metre bridge is the longest of its type in Australia. Although it took hundreds of men 10 years to build, not a single life was lost in the construction.

    The Burdekin is becoming more and more famous for its wealth of water. Local farms are drought-proof because of the mighty Burdekin River, the huge reserves of the Burdekin Falls Dam and a massive underground aquifer which lies just 10 metres below the surface. This ‘liquid gold’ allows Burdekin farmers to produce the biggest and sweetest sugar cane in Australia, as well as mangoes, melons, capsicums, zucchinis, tomatoes and many other small crops.

    By far the district’s greatest claim to fame is its fishing. The Burdekin is well-known for its barramundi, mudcrabs, other estuary species and off-coast reef fishing. The district has one of the highest rates of boat ownership per head of population and many locals have fishing huts at Ocean Creek, Plantation Creek, Groper Creek or Wunjunga.

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