Heritage Attractions

Brandon’s Heritage Estate
The Brandon Heritage Precinct is located in Spiller Street, Brandon.  It includes the restored St Patrick’s Church, the former Brandon Railway Station, and an extensive display of machinery used in the sugar industry housed in the former Renown Theatre building, the John Tait Steam Gallery and the Alf Shand Blacksmith Shop and Fielding Engine Shed.  The precinct is operated by the Burdekin Machinery Preservationists.

The most significant item on display is the restored Burdekin Tractor – a c.1911 Marshall Colonial Class C 2 cylinder single speed model oil tractor, rated 16 H.P. (30-35 B.H.P.), with closed circuit cooling system.  It is the only remaining tractor of its type in Australia.  It was imported by the Drysdale Brothers in 1913.  The brothers were highly influential in the history of the Burdekin sugar industry, pioneering new mills and cane lands in the district.

Charlie’s Hill
Located south of Home Hill, Charlie’s Hill was part of the frontline defence of Australia during World War II and included a radar station noted in the Queensland Heritage Register for its historical and military significance.

Drysdale Clock Tower
The original town clock built in 1930 in honour of John Drysdale can be found in Queen Street, Ayr.

Gudjuda Reference Group Aboriginal Corporation’s Cultural Centre and Keeping Place
Opened in 2005. The centre that was formally the historical School of Arts building is fully air-conditioned and beautifully restored to include original polished floors and re-located at Plantation Park.

Home Hill Lions Club’s Diorama
A tribute to the region’s pioneers, the Diorama traces the river and the sugar industry from its roots. As you cross the Burdekin Bridge from Ayr and approach Home Hill it is on the left of the highway.

Home Hill’s Pioneer Avenue
Located in Eighth Avenue is a monument to the pioneering families of the Home Hill district. Bollards underneath the shady trees give details of pioneering people and families and outline their contribution to the area.

Juru Walk
At the rear of Plantation Park in Ayr is an important link to the Burdekin’s Aboriginal history. The walk winds its way through what is believed to be the Burdekin’s last remaining remnant rainforest – includes a bat settlement and lagoon.

Living Lagoon
In front of the Burdekin Theatre in Queen Street recognises the importance of water to the Burdekin community.

Lloyd Mann Park
Situated on Eighth Avenue, Home Hill next to the Police Station. A cement walking track to guide tourists to its many natural and cultural attractions i.e. aboriginal artwork inscribed into the walking track. Lloyd Mann Park has an interesting history in that it was originally the police horse paddock before being used as a World War II petrol dump.

Plantation Park’s Serpentine Sentinel
The totem animal for the local Juru tribe located at Plantation Park. It is a 53 metre statue.

Zaro Cultural Centre
Now located in Queen Street, Ayr. Its owners are the first Torres Strait Islanders to open a business for the retail of traditional and contemporary indigenous art and crafts.

 

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