Land Protection

Council’s Pest Management officers can offer information and assistance on matters relating to Declared Pest Plants and Animals in the Burdekin Shire area.

Council responsibilities include:

  • development and implementation of Pest Management Plans;
  • control of declared plants and declared animals within the Council area in accordance with the Land Protection (Pest and Stock Route Management) Act 2002;
  • prevention of the introduction and spread of declared plants and animals within the Council area; and
  • enforcement of relevant provisions of the Land Protection (Pest and Stock Route Management) Act 2002.

Landholder responsibilities:

  • control declared plants and declared animals on their own land.
  • Aquatic Weeds and Riparian Management Agreements

    Burdekin Shire Council area has numerous varieties of aquatic pest plants. Some activities Pest Management officers undertake, in order to combat the spread of aquatic weed include: Monitoring known sites Boat boom spraying Quickspray unit spraying Weedharvester Biological Control   RIPARIAN MANAGEMENT AGREEMENTS Landholders living near or adjacent to waterways in the Burdekin are able [...]

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    Burdekin Shire Council area has numerous varieties of aquatic pest plants.

    Some activities Pest Management officers undertake, in order to combat the spread of aquatic weed include:

    Monitoring known sites

    Boat boom spraying

    Quickspray unit spraying

    Weedharvester

    Biological Control

     

    RIPARIAN MANAGEMENT AGREEMENTS

    Landholders living near or adjacent to waterways in the Burdekin are able to participate in a proactive program called Riparian Management Agreements (RMA’s).  Landholders and Council both contribute money towards the agreement which allows Pest Management Officers the opportunity to manage and maintain certain key areas of water ways for aquatic weeds.  For more information please contact Council on 47 839 800.

  • Declared Pest Animals Queensland

    Pest animals pose a major economic, environmental and social threat to our region. The main animals of concern are dingo/feral dogs, feral pigs, foxes, rabbits, deer and feral cats all are declared pests under State Legislation. Council has strategies for the control of pest animals in the Burdekin Shire.

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    Declared Pest Animals

    Pest animals pose a major economic, environmental and social threat to our region.  The main animals of concern are dingo/feral dogs, feral pigs, foxes, rabbits, deer and feral cats all are declared pests under State Legislation.  Under the Land Protection (Pest and Stock Route Management) Act 2002, the responsibility for control of feral animals rests with the landholder.

    Council, however can offer assistance to any landholders experiencing problems with feral animals through the provision of baiting, trap hire and providing advice on the most effective control options available to landholders.

    Council has strategies for the control of pest animals in the Burdekin Shire.  Please see the Council’s Pest Management Plan 2016-2019 for more information on the management strategies for declared pest animals in the Burdekin.

    Dingoes/ Wild dogs

    The term wild dog refers collectively to pure bred dingoes, dingo hybrids and domestic dogs that have escaped or been deliberately released.

    Dingoes and wild dogs are declared pests under the Land Protection (Pest and Stock Route Management) Act 2002.  Therefore it is illegal to introduce, keep or sell them and their numbers should be reduced.  It is the obligation of the landholder to control wild dogs on their land.  A wild dog bounty is available for wild dogs destroyed within the Burdekin Shire Council area.  Conditions apply – contact Customer Service for more details.

    For further information on dingoes and wild dogs, visit the Biosecurity Queensland website.

    Feral Pigs

    Feral pigs are a declared class 2 pest animal under the Land Protection (Pest and Stock Route Management) Act 2002 and a high priority for control under Council’s Pest Management Plan 2016-2019.  Therefore it is illegal to introduce, keep or sell them and their numbers should be reduced.  Strategic actions in the Pest Management Plan to contain feral pigs include trapping and baiting.

    For further information on feral pigs, visit the Biosecurity Queensland website.

    Feral Deer

    Locally Chital deer occur on Rita Island and other places within the shire. The deer at Rita Island impact on cane crops in the early growth stages and cause friction between farmers and graziers as they sometimes harbour in the grazing areas during the day. These animals cause major damage to environmental areas and in particular native trees as they habitually rub their hard, sharp antlers on the bark and trunks of saplings and trees. Because of the attractiveness of these animals there are also mixed feelings in the community regarding control options.

    Chital deer are a Class 2 pest animal under the Land Protection (Pest and Stock Route Management) Act 2002.  Council has identified chital deer as a high priority in Council’s Pest Management Plan 2016-2019 and is currently developing a strategy to address this pest animal.

    Rabbits

    European rabbits are a declared class 2 pest animal under the Land Protection (Pest and Stock Route Management) Act 2002 and a medium priority for control under Council’s Pest Management Plan 2016-2019.  Therefore it is illegal to introduce, keep or sell them and their numbers should be reduced.  Rabbits are not permitted to be kept by residents in Queensland.  Certain organisations are permitted to keep rabbits, but this is regulated by Biosecurity Queensland.

    For further information on rabbits, visit the Biosecurity Queensland website.

    Foxes

    Foxes are wide spread throughout our region and can cause losses to poultry and small domestic animals.  They also pose a major threat to nesting sea turtles in coastal areas. Control of foxes can be achieved by shooting, trapping, exclusion fencing, fumigation or poisoning.

    Pest Fish

    There are a number of species of fish in Burdekin’s waterways that compete with native fish for resources and threaten the natural ecosystem of our rivers.

    One of the worst offenders is tilapia and it has been declared noxious in Queensland.

    For further information on pest fish species, visit the Biosecurity Queensland website.

  • Declared Pest Plants Queensland

    Council has strategies for preventing the introduction, eradicating and containing declared pest plants in the Burdekin. Managment strategies for the most comon pest plants can be found in the Burdekin Shire Pest Management Plan.

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    Declared Pest Plants

    Council has strategies for preventing the introduction, eradicating and containing declared pest plants in the Burdekin.  Managment strategies for the most comon pest plants can be found in the Burdekin Shire Pest Management Plan 2016-2019.

    Below is a list of some of the locally declared pest plants found in the Burdekin Shire.

    Locally Declared Pest Plants:

    • Grader Grass
    • Itch Grass
    • Aleman Grass
    • Leucaena

    State Declared Pest Plants:

    Please see Biosecurity Queensland website.

     

     

     

  • Chital-deer

    Feral Deer

    Deer have been classified as a Class 2 pest under the Land Protection (Stock Route and Pest Management) Act 2002. Council has been working with landholders on Rita Island to address the Feral Deer problem currently being experienced that is affecting crops and grass for stock feed.

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    Deer have been classified as a Class 2 pest under the Land Protection (Stock Route and Pest Management) Act 2002. Deer have to be kept under certain conditions to be classified as farmed deer. Breaches of these conditions classifies the deer as a pest.

    Chital deer (Axis axis) were introduced to Rita Island in the 1970’s and during years of drought, such as we are experiencing now, have increased in population with a corresponding increase in damage to land and crops.

    Council has been working with landholders on Rita Island to address the Feral Deer problem currently being experienced that is affecting crops and grass for stock feed.

    In August 2015 Council engaged the services of a contractor with experience in pest animals and followed this up with a meeting with landholders on September 2015 to start determining a way forward. The notes from the meeting are available using the following link:

    Following the meeting Council has been in contact with various organisations and businesses to gather information on cost effective ways to address the feral deer problem.

    On 13 October 2015 the contractor’s report was submitted to Council and Council adopted the following recommendations in line with the report.  In order of preference the options are:

    • Trapping
    • Aerial shooting (including mustering)
    • Ground shooting
    • Exclusion fencing
    • Barrier fencing

    The above plan is not rigid and may change with a change in circumstances to ensure the most appropriate control option in being implemented.

    Trapping is currently being organised and should commence shortly.

    The full report from FeralFix is available using the following link

    Council will continue to provide updates as available. Further information on chital deer or other pest animals is available on the Biosecurity Queensland website.

  • Feral pig/dingo 1080 baiting

    Request for feral pig/dingo baiting Council undertakes 1080 baiting for control of  wild dogs and feral pigs.  A co-ordinated wild dog baiting programme is held in October/November each year.  Landholders requiring to bait outside of these times should contact Council's Pest Management Officers on 47 839800. Council provides a free 1080 baiting service to landholders for [...]

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    Request for feral pig/dingo baiting

    Council undertakes 1080 baiting for control of  wild dogs and feral pigs.  A co-ordinated wild dog baiting programme is held in October/November each year.  Landholders requiring to bait outside of these times should contact Council’s Pest Management Officers on 47 839800.

    Council provides a free 1080 baiting service to landholders for the control and eradication of declared animals such as wild dogs and feral pigs year round. For feral pigs landholders provide the bait and feed the animals for a few days so they keep coming back to the baiting site. Once the animals are  feeding on the untreated bait and Biosecurity regulations have been followed,  Council’s Pest Management Officers then treat the bait/s with 1080 poison.  Wild dog baits are injected by Pest Management Officers and placed strategically around the property by the landholder after Biosecurity regulations and bait sizes are followed.

    Note: Restrictions apply for accessing 1080 poison. For more information on 1080 regulations and restrictions visit Biosecurity Queensland website.

    For further information or to request a baiting service please contact Customer Service  4783 9800.

  • Hire of Quikspray Unit

    Council is in possession of two (2) Quikspray units. These units are available to landholders to hire out for a small fee of $30.00. Bookings are essential. If you would like to hire Council's Quikspray unit please contact Council's Customer Service Centre on 4783 9800.

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    Council is in possession of two (2) Quikspray units. These units are available to landholders to hire out for a small fee of $30.00.

    Bookings are essential. If you would like to hire Council’s Quikspray unit please contact Council’s Customer Service Centre on 4783 9800.

  • Aedes Aegypti Adult (Dengue Fever Mosquito)

    Mosquitoes

    Pest Management Officers apply an approved biological larvacide to treat mosquito larvae at breeding sites in the Burdekin Shire. Common coastal breeding sites are located at around Alva Beach, Plantation Creek with fresh water breeding sites concentrated around agricultural run off pooling and  Council's town drains. These sites are checked for breeding activity weekly, throughout the year. If [...]

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    Pest Management Officers apply an approved biological larvacide to treat mosquito larvae at breeding sites in the Burdekin Shire. Common coastal breeding sites are located at around Alva Beach, Plantation Creek with fresh water breeding sites concentrated around agricultural run off pooling and  Council’s town drains. These sites are checked for breeding activity weekly, throughout the year.

    If you are aware of stagnant water lying on either Council land or privately owned land please contact Council so Pest Management Officers can inspect the site and treat the matter accordingly.

    Mosquito fogging is no longer carried out. Council arranges with a private pest control contractor to apply a mosquito barrier treatment to Council parks and facilities.

    For further information on mosquitoes please contact Council’s Customer Service Centre on (07) 4783 9800

  • Property Pest Management Plans – Herbicide Subsidy Scheme

    A Property Pest Management Plan (PPMP) is an integral part of an overall property management plan, which accounts for the management of natural and human resources, finances, production and marketing of that property. The development of the PPMP and identification of pest weeds on the property then allows access to Council's Herbicide Subsidy Scheme.

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    A Property Pest Management Plan is an integral part of an overall property management plan, which accounts for the management of natural and human resources, finances, production and marketing of that property.

    What are Property Pest Management Plans (PPMPs)?

    A PPMP is a plan developed by a landholder with assistance from a Pest Management Officer  for the strategic management of pest plants and animals on the property.

    Whether your property is two hectares or 2000 hectares, a PPMP will faciliate the planned and coordinated management of pest plants and pest animals on your property.  It will contribute to the profitable and sustainable management of your property.

    The development and implementation of a PPMP will also help to coordinate pest management activities across property boundaries.

    What are the benefits of a PPMP?

    The benefits in developing and implementing a PPMP are:

    • Prioritisation of the management of pests on your property in line with Burdekin Shire Local Government Area Pest Management Plan;
    • Enables you to prioritise the use of resources to control pests in the most effective manner;
    • Identifies the best time to control pests and the best methods to use for each situation. 

    How do I develop a PPMP?

    If you are interested in developing a pest management plan for your property, please contact Council’s Customer Service Centre on 4783 9800 and a request will be raised for Council’s Pest Management Officer to contact you to make suitable arrangements.

    Note:  The Property Pest Management Plan needs to be renewed to access the allocated herbicide under the Herbicide Subsidy Scheme.

    Herbicide Subsidy Scheme

    Once landholders have developed a Property Pest Management Plan they are able to apply for access to Council’s Herbicide Subsidy Scheme.  This scheme provides 50% of the costs of the herbicide chemical to spray the declared weeds that have been identified on the property.  The amount and type of chemical provided depends on what weeds are present and the size of the weed infestation.

    The Herbicide Subsidy Scheme is funded via Council’s Environmental Levy.

    Contact Council’s Customer Service Centre on 07 4783 9800 for further information.

  • Vermin – Rats and Mice

    The Public Health Regulation 2005 makes it an offence for people to harbour or breed vermin on their property. Vermin includes rats and mice, which are capable of carrying or transmitting a disease.

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    The Public Health Regulation 2005 makes it an offence for people to harbour or breed vermin on their property. Vermin includes rats and mice, which are capable of carrying or transmitting a disease. An owner of a property must ensure that it is kept in such a way that vegetation or buildings should not act as a form of shelter or attraction for vermin. Regular maintenance of your yard and any buildings or structures can help in the eradication of vermin harbourage and breeding. For vacant land this would mean ensuring the grass mown is mown regularly.

    What do I do if I have a concern about a neighbour’s property?

    Contact council to lodge a complaint. Your name and address will be required together with the location of the offending property. Personal details are of a confidential nature.

    What action does Council take?

    An inspection is carried out to determine the extent of the breach under the Public Health Regulation 2005. If the complaint is justified a notice is served on the owner requiring such person to attend to clearance to Council’s satisfaction within a period of fourteen (14) days.

    What happens if a person does not comply?

    Should the owner not take the necessary action to remove and prevent the harbourage of vermin within the specified period, Council’s contractor will be commissioned to enter upon the property and carry out the required works. Council costs incurred in this eventuality will become a charge upon the land.

    What happens if I receive a notice under the Public Health Act?

    You will be required to take the necessary action outlined in the notice to prevent the harbourage or attraction of vermin within your property boundary.

    Cost Recovery

    If Council contractors are required to enter and carry out the works after the expiration of notices, an administration cost and the cost of carrying out the works will be placed as a charge against the land.

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