Land Protection

Council’s Environment and Health section offers information and assistance on matters relating to Declared Pests in the Burdekin Shire area.

Council responsibilities include:

  • development and implementation of Pest Management Plans;
  • control of declared plants and declared animals within the Council area in accordance with the Land Protection (Pest and Stock Route Management) Act 2002;
  • prevention of the introduction and spread of declared plants and animals within the Council area; and
  • enforcement of relevant provisions of the Land Protection (Pest and Stock Route Management) Act 2002.

Landholder responsibilities:

  • control declared plants and declared animals on their own land.
  • Declared Pest Animals for the Burdekin Shire

    Pest animals pose a major economic, environmental and social threat to our region. The main animals of concern are dingo/feral dogs, feral pigs, foxes, rabbits, deer and feral cats all are declared pests under State Legislation. Council has strategies for the control of pest animals in the Burdekin Shire.

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    Declared Pest Animals 

    Pest animals pose a major economic, environmental and social threat to our region.  The main animals of concern are dingo/feral dogs, feral pigs, foxes, rabbits, deer and feral cats all are declared pests under State Legislation.  Under the Land Protection (Pest and Stock Route Management) Act 2002, the responsibiity for control of feral animals rests with the landholder.

    Council, however can offer assistance to any landholders experiencing problems with feral animals through the provision of biannual, co-ordinated baiting programmes, trap hire and providing advice on the most effective control options available to landholders.

    Council has strategies for the control of pest animals in the Burdekin Shire.  Please see the Council’s Pest Management Plan 2010-2013 for more information on the management strategies for declared pest animals in the Burdekin.

    Dingoes/ Wild dogs

    Wild dogs are all dogs that are not domesticated including dingoes, feral dogs and hybrids/crosses between the two. 

    Dingoes are native Australian dogs believed to have migrated from South-East Asia about 5000 years ago and have had a lasting natural impact on Australian native animals.  Dingoes are not easily distinguished from domestic dogs.  They can be identified only by detailed skull measurements and relative tooth size, and by their genetic make up.  They:

    • Are usually ginger and yellow with white feet and chest
    • May be pure white, ginger, black and tan, or pure black
    • Breed only once a year, in early winter

    Feral dogs are abandoned or strayed domestic dogs living in a wild state in the bush or in an urban environment.

    Dingoes and wild dogs are declared pests under the Land Protection (Pest and Stock Route Management) Act 2002.  Therefore it is illegal to introduce, keep or sell them and their numbers should be reduced.  Legally, the primary responsibility for wild dog control lies with landholders, however, in built up areas, local government may help coordinate programs.

    The problem

    Numbers of wild dogs may have increased due to the increased availability of water on farms, the consequent increase in potential prey such as native animal species, livestock and rabbits and the increased availability of food associated with human settlement.

    • In rural areas, they can reduce the viability of sheep, goat and cattle farming.
    • They can be a hazard to livestock, poultry, pets and humans in boundary areas between urban and rural environments.
    • They can carry both canine and human animal diseases, including distemper, neospora, canine parvovirus and hydatid worms.

    For further information on dingoes and wild dogs, visit the Biosecurity Queensland website.  

    Feral Pigs

    Feral pigs are a declared class 2 pest animal under the Land Protection (Pest and Stock Route Management) Act 2002 and a high priority for control under Council’s Pest Management Plan 2010-2013.  Therefore it is illegal to introduce, keep or sell them and their numbers should be reduced.  Strategic actions in the Pest Management Plan to contain feral pigs include trapping and baiting. 

    For further information on feral pigs, visit the Biosecurity Queensland website.

    Feral Deer

    Locally Chital deer occur on Rita Island and at Mt Elliot near Giru. The deer at Rita Island impact on cane crops in the early growth stages and cause friction between farmers and graziers as they sometimes harbour in the grazing areas during the day. These animals cause major damage to environmental areas and in particular native trees as they habitually rub their hard, sharp antlers on the bark and trunks of saplings and trees. Because of the attractiveness of these animals there are also mixed feelings in the community regarding control options.

    Chital deer are a Class 2 pest animal under the Land Protection (Pest and Stock Route Management) Act 2002.  Council has identified chital deer as a high priority in Council’s Pest Management Plan 2010-2013 and is currently developing a strategy to address this pest animal. 

    Rabbits

    European rabbits are a declared class 2 pest animal under the Land Protection (Pest and Stock Route Management) Act 2002 and a medium priority for control under Council’s Pest Management Plan 2010-2013.  Therefore it is illegal to introduce, keep or sell them and their numbers should be reduced.  Rabbits are not permitted to be kept by residents in Queensland.  Certain organisations are permitted to keep rabbits, but this is regulated by Biosecurity Queensland. 

    For further information on rabbits, visit the Biosecurity Queensland website.

    Foxes

    Foxes are wide spread throughout our region and can cause losses to poultry and small domestic animals.  They also pose a major threat to nesting sea turtles in coastal areas. Control of foxes can be achieved by shooting, trapping, exclusion fencing, fumigation or poisoning.

    Pest Fish

    There are a number of species of fish in Burdekin’s waterways that compete with native fish for resources and threaten the natural ecosystem of our rivers. 

    One of the worst offenders is tilapia and it has been declared noxious in Queensland. 

    For further information on pest fish species, visit the Biosecurity Queensland website.  

  • Declared Pest Plants Queensland

    Council has strategies for preventing the introduction, eradicating and containing declared pest plants in the Burdekin. Managment strategies for the most comon pest plants can be found in the Burdekin Shire Pest Management Plan.

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    Declared Pest Plants

    Council has strategies for preventing the introduction, eradicating and containing declared pest plants in the Burdekin.  Managment strategies for the most comon pest plants can be found in the Burdekin Shire Pest Management Plan.

    Below is a list of some of the locally and state declared pest plants found in the Burdekin Shire region-

    Locally Declared Pest Plants:

    • Grader Grass
    • Itch Grass
    • Aleman Grass
    • Leucaena

    State Declared Pest Plants:

    • Parthenium weed
    • Rubber Vine
    • Chinee Apple
    • Prickly Acacia
    • Pond Apple
    • Lantana
    • Belly Ache Bush
    • Salvinia
    • Water Hyacinth
    • Rats Tail Grasses
    • Parkinsonia
    • Hymenachne
    • Captain Cook Tree

     

    For more information and fact sheets about these pest plants and others visit the Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries website.

  • Feral pig/dingo 1080 baiting

    Request for feral pig/dingo baiting Council undertakes 1080 baiting for control of dingoes, wild dogs and feral pigs.  A co-ordinated wild dog baiting programme is held in May and October each year and is advertised in local newspapers.  Landholders requiring to bait outside of these times should contact Council's Land Protection Officers.   Council provides a free [...]

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    Request for feral pig/dingo baiting

    Council undertakes 1080 baiting for control of dingoes, wild dogs and feral pigs.  A co-ordinated wild dog baiting programme is held in May and October each year and is advertised in local newspapers.  Landholders requiring to bait outside of these times should contact Council’s Land Protection Officers.  

    Council provides a free 1080 baiting service to landholders for the control and eradication of declared animals such as dingoes and feral pigs. Landholders provide the bait and feed the animals for a few days so they keep coming back to the baiting site. Once the animals are all feeding in the one site Council’s Land Protection Officer injects the bait with 1080 poison.

    Note: Restrictions apply for accessing 1080 poison. 1080 baiting can only be done in rural areas as in town the landholder may poison a neighbours pets if they feed on the bait.

    If you live close to town and are having problems with dingoes you may have to use dingo traps instead.

    For further information or to request a baiting service please contact Customer Service 07 4783 9800.

  • Hire of Quikspray Unit

    Council is in possession of two (2) Quikspray units. These units are available to landholders to hire out for a small fee of $27.50. Bookings are essential. If you would like to hire Council's Quikspray unit please contact Council's Customer Service Centre on 4783 9800.

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    Council is in possession of two (2) Quikspray units. These units are available to landholders to hire out for a small fee of $27.50.

    Bookings are essential. If you would like to hire Council’s Quikspray unit please contact Council’s Customer Service Centre on 4783 9800.

  • Aedes Aegypti Adult (Dengue Fever Mosquito)

    Mosquitoes

    The vector control unit apply approved chemicals to breeding sites in the Burdekin Shire. Common breeding sites are located at Alva Beach, Plantation Creek and Council's town drains. These sites are checked for breeding activity on a regualr basis throughout the year. If you are aware of stagnant water lying on either Council land or privately owned land [...]

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    The vector control unit apply approved chemicals to breeding sites in the Burdekin Shire. Common breeding sites are located at Alva Beach, Plantation Creek and Council’s town drains. These sites are checked for breeding activity on a regualr basis throughout the year.

    If you are aware of stagnant water lying on either Council land or privately owned land please contact Council so the vector control unit can inspect the site and treat the matter accordingly.

    Mosquito fogging is no longer carried out. Council arranges with a private pest control contractor to apply a mosquito barrier treatment called Bistar to Council parks and facilities.

    Information on Bistar

    Bistar:

    • is ideal for external barrier treatments and indoor residual surface treatments;
    • has unique long lasting control for mosquitoes and flies;
    • manages both disease and nuisance insects;
    • is a water based formula so is safe to apply to ornamental plants, walls and under furniture;
    • is odourless and does not stain surfaces;
    • is very toxic to aquatic organisms so it is not advised to be used if you have a fish pond or tank.

    For further information on mosquitoes please contact Council’s Customer Service Centre on (07) 4783 9800

  • Property Pest Management Plans – Herbicide Subsidy Scheme

    A Property Pest Management Plan (PPMP) is an integral part of an overall property management plan, which accounts for the management of natural and human resources, finances, production and marketing of that property. The development of the PPMP and identification of pest weeds on the property then allows access to Council's Herbicide Subsidy Scheme.

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    A Property Pest Management Plan is an integral part of an overall property management plan, which accounts for the management of natural and human resources, finances, production and marketing of that property. 

    What are Property Pest Management Plans (PPMPs)?

    A PPMP is a plan developed by a landholder with assistance from an officer from Council’s Environment and Health section for the strategic management of pest plants and animals on your property.

    Whether your property is two hectares or 2000 hectares, a PPMP will faciliate the planned and coordinated management of pest plants and pest animals on your property.  It will contribute to the profitable and sustainable management of your property.

    The development and implementation of a PPMP will also help to coordinate pest management activities across property boundaries.

    What are the benefits of a PPMP? 

    The benefits in developing and implementing a PPMP are:

    • Prioritisation of the management of pests on your property in line with Burdekin Shire Local Government Area Pest Management Plan;
    • Enables you to prioritise the use of resources to control pests in the most effective manner;
    • Identifies the best time to control pests and the best methods to use for each situation. 

    How do I develop a PPMP?

    If you are interested in developing a pest management plan for your property, please contact Council’s Customer Service Centre on 4783 9800 and a request will be raised for Council’s Pest Management Officer to contact you to make suitable arrangements.

    Note:  The Property Pest Management Plan needs to be renewed each year to access the yearly quota of chemical under the Herbicide Subsidy Scheme.

    Herbicide Subsidy Scheme

    Once landholders have developed a Property Pest Management Plan they are able to apply for access to Council’s Herbicide Subsidy Scheme.  This scheme provides 50% of the costs of the herbicide chemical to spray the declared weeds that have been identified on the property.  The amount and type of chemical provided depends on what weeds are present and the size of the weed infestation. 

    The Herbicide Subsidy Scheme is funded via Council’s Environmental Levy.

    Contact Council’s Customer Service Centre on 07 4783 9800 for further information.

  • Vermin – Rats and Mice

    The Public Health Regulation 2005 makes it an offence for people to harbour or breed vermin on their property. Vermin includes rats and mice, which are capable of carrying or transmitting a disease.

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    The Public Health Regulation 2005 makes it an offence for people to harbour or breed vermin on their property. Vermin includes rats and mice, which are capable of carrying or transmitting a disease. An owner of a property must ensure that it is kept in such a way that vegetation or buildings should not act as a form of shelter or attraction for vermin. Regular maintenance of your yard and any buildings or structures can help in the eradication of vermin harbourage and breeding. For vacant land this would mean ensuring the grass mown is mown regularly.

    What do I do if I have a concern about a neighbour’s property?

    Contact council to lodge a complaint. Your name and address will be required together with the location of the offending property. Personal details are of a confidential nature.

    What action does Council take?

    An inspection is carried out to determine the extent of the breach under the Public Health Regulation 2005. If the complaint is justified a notice is served on the owner requiring such person to attend to clearance to Council’s satisfaction within a period of fourteen (14) days.

    What happens if a person does not comply?

    Should the owner not take the necessary action to remove and prevent the harbourage of vermin within the specified period, Council’s contractor will be commissioned to enter upon the property and carry out the required works. Council costs incurred in this eventuality will become a charge upon the land.

    What happens if I receive a notice under the Public Health Act?

    You will be required to take the necessary action outlined in the notice to prevent the harbourage or attraction of vermin within your property boundary.

    Cost Recovery

    If Council contractors are required to enter and carry out the works after the expiration of notices, an administration cost and the cost of carrying out the works will be placed as a charge against the land.

  • Weeds

    Weed Complaints or Reports If you would like to report sightings of weed infestations please contact Customer Service 4783 9800. Council treats weeds on footpaths annually but will respond if a request is made. Weed Plant Identification If you have found a weed on your property and would like it identified, contact Customer Service who [...]

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    Weed Complaints or Reports

    If you would like to report sightings of weed infestations please contact Customer Service 4783 9800. Council treats weeds on footpaths annually but will respond if a request is made.

    Weed Plant Identification

    If you have found a weed on your property and would like it identified, contact Customer Service who will pass on your information to a Land Protection Officer (LPO). The LPO will then need to complete a site inpsection.

    Declared weed and plant fact sheets are available in the Customer Service Centre or alternatively you can visit the Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries website for more information.

    Weed Harvester

    The Council have a weed harvester which can be made available to clear waterways on your property of declared weed. This harvester is also available to be used by other Shire/City Councils.

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