Declared Pest Animals Queensland

Declared Pest Animals

Pest animals pose a major economic, environmental and social threat to our region.  The main animals of concern are dingo/feral dogs, feral pigs, foxes, rabbits, deer and feral cats all are declared pests under State Legislation.  Under the Land Protection (Pest and Stock Route Management) Act 2002, the responsibility for control of feral animals rests with the landholder.

Council, however can offer assistance to any landholders experiencing problems with feral animals through the provision of baiting, trap hire and providing advice on the most effective control options available to landholders.

Council has strategies for the control of pest animals in the Burdekin Shire.  Please see the Council’s Pest Management Plan 2016-2019 for more information on the management strategies for declared pest animals in the Burdekin.

Dingoes/ Wild dogs

The term wild dog refers collectively to pure bred dingoes, dingo hybrids and domestic dogs that have escaped or been deliberately released.

Dingoes and wild dogs are declared pests under the Land Protection (Pest and Stock Route Management) Act 2002.  Therefore it is illegal to introduce, keep or sell them and their numbers should be reduced.  It is the obligation of the landholder to control wild dogs on their land.  A wild dog bounty is available for wild dogs destroyed within the Burdekin Shire Council area.  Conditions apply – contact Customer Service for more details.

For further information on dingoes and wild dogs, visit the Biosecurity Queensland website.

Feral Pigs

Feral pigs are a declared class 2 pest animal under the Land Protection (Pest and Stock Route Management) Act 2002 and a high priority for control under Council’s Pest Management Plan 2016-2019.  Therefore it is illegal to introduce, keep or sell them and their numbers should be reduced.  Strategic actions in the Pest Management Plan to contain feral pigs include trapping and baiting.

For further information on feral pigs, visit the Biosecurity Queensland website.

Feral Deer

Locally Chital deer occur on Rita Island and other places within the shire. The deer at Rita Island impact on cane crops in the early growth stages and cause friction between farmers and graziers as they sometimes harbour in the grazing areas during the day. These animals cause major damage to environmental areas and in particular native trees as they habitually rub their hard, sharp antlers on the bark and trunks of saplings and trees. Because of the attractiveness of these animals there are also mixed feelings in the community regarding control options.

Chital deer are a Class 2 pest animal under the Land Protection (Pest and Stock Route Management) Act 2002.  Council has identified chital deer as a high priority in Council’s Pest Management Plan 2016-2019 and is currently developing a strategy to address this pest animal.

Rabbits

European rabbits are a declared class 2 pest animal under the Land Protection (Pest and Stock Route Management) Act 2002 and a medium priority for control under Council’s Pest Management Plan 2016-2019.  Therefore it is illegal to introduce, keep or sell them and their numbers should be reduced.  Rabbits are not permitted to be kept by residents in Queensland.  Certain organisations are permitted to keep rabbits, but this is regulated by Biosecurity Queensland.

For further information on rabbits, visit the Biosecurity Queensland website.

Foxes

Foxes are wide spread throughout our region and can cause losses to poultry and small domestic animals.  They also pose a major threat to nesting sea turtles in coastal areas. Control of foxes can be achieved by shooting, trapping, exclusion fencing, fumigation or poisoning.

Pest Fish

There are a number of species of fish in Burdekin’s waterways that compete with native fish for resources and threaten the natural ecosystem of our rivers.

One of the worst offenders is tilapia and it has been declared noxious in Queensland.

For further information on pest fish species, visit the Biosecurity Queensland website.

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