Recycling

Recycling Dont Bag Your Recyclables

The Burdekin Shire Council Kirknie Road Landfill receives vast quantities of waste on a daily basis and the cost of ongoing management is extremely expensive. Unfortunately a large proportion of this waste is potentially recyclable. All persons are encouraged to separate materials for recycling to ensure that waste is not disposed to the Landfill unnecessarily.

Recycling is not only environmentally friendly but can be extremely cost effective. Council imposes a nil/minimum fee for items that can be reprocessed and placed into the designated recycling areas i.e. metals, paper/cardboard, green waste, timber and second-hand household items.

Council provides a recycling service for the following items and strongly encourages public use of this service.

  • TYRES (with/without rims)
  • BATTERIES
  • WHITE GOODS
  • HOUSEHOLD ITEMS (i.e. bicycles, garden items etc)
  • WASTE OIL
  • PETROLEUM PRODUCTS
  • OIL FILTERS
  • CAR BODIES
  • ALUMINIUM CANS
  • GLASS BOTTLES/JARS
  • SCRAP METAL
  • GREENWASTE and TIMBER

Please note that you will need to sort your waste into the relevant categories above and cardboard needs to be flat packed.

  • Composting

    Turning your rubbish into fertilizer Every year, Australians throw away thousands of tonnes of household waste. Next time you take out your wheelie bin, look at what you are throwing away! Almost half of our domestic rubbish consists of kitchen and garden waste. Most of this material can be composted. Composting reduces the amount of [...]

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    Turning your rubbish into fertilizer

    Every year, Australians throw away thousands of tonnes of household waste. Next time you take out your wheelie bin, look at what you are throwing away!

    Almost half of our domestic rubbish consists of kitchen and garden waste. Most of this material can be composted. Composting reduces the amount of rubbish we throw away, decreases our need for landfill sites and provides a chemical-free fertilizer for our gardens.

    Composting is a cheap and hygienic method of converting your kitchen and garden waste into a clean-smelling material used in the garden as a soil conditioner. Properly controlled, it should end up as a dark, crumbly fertilizer with a pleasant, earthy smell.

    Compost not only returns nutrients to the soil that would otherwise be lost, but also improves soil structure and increases the water holding capacity of the soil.

    Composting is not new. Compost has been used in crop production for over 4000 years. Artificial fertilizers only became widely available a century ago. Australia, an old, eroded continent, is suffering from land degradation. Composting is one of the keys to soil care in rural and urban situations.

    How do I compost?

    Compost can be made in either a heap or bin, depending on the amount of material for composting and the needs and size of your garden.

    A heap is useful for gardeners with large quantities of waste. Minimum dimensions should be one cubic metre, sufficient to ensure a hot temperature. The heap may be enclosed using bricks or timber. Leave an access area or work space at the front of the heap for turning the compost and cover it with a lid or piece of carpet to retain heat and provide protection from rain.

    A compost bin is often better for smaller, suburban gardens. Plastic bins, metal tumblers and plastic tumblers can be purchased from nurseries, hardware stores and local councils. Compost tumblers are available for gardeners who prefer to make compost in bins and want quick results.

    Bins should be open at the top and bottom. The top needs a tight-fitting lid. The other end is placed in contact with the soil to allow earthworms to enter. These little gardeners speed the decaying process by loosening the compost and allowing air to enter and circulate. Avoid placing the bin or heap too close to houses. Consider placing it directly on level soil in a garden bed.

    Two bins or heaps allow material to accumulate in one while composting in the other. The heap should be protected from hot sun and heavy rain to prevent excess drying or moisture, which prevent effective composting.

    Compost works best if you add a balanced mixture of rapidly decomposing ‘green’ material (e.g. fruit and vegetable scraps) and ‘brown’ material, which decomposes slowly (e.g. twigs). These can be added in any order.

    Once you have a mixture of materials, cover with a layer of soil, add some water and a lid to keep the heat in and speed the rotting process.

    Composting matter should feel damp, but if waterlogged it will smell, attract flies and be inefficient. Control the moisture level by adding absorbent materials such as sawdust, newspaper, straw or dry manure.

    Turning the heap with a fork will speed decomposition. The more frequently the material is turned, the faster it will decompose. Care should be taken to make sure that all material is turned into the inner, hottest part of the heap where weed seeds and pathogens are destroyed. If the heap is turned regularly, the compost should be ready for use in a month or two. Your compost can sometimes be smelly when you turn it, so set up your compost away from your neighbours! The heap may be left unturned, but the process could take an extra six to twelve months.

    Compost is ready to use when it has a crumbly appearance, an earthy smell and identifying what things were is difficult!

    Water – Keep the compost just damp. Overwatering will ruin your compost.

    Balance – Add a mix of green and brown materials to make a well balanced compost.

    Air – Turn the pile over every few weeks or every 4-6 days if using a bin.

    Size – A compost heap will mature quickest if it is at least one cubic metre.

    Micro-organisms – Soil animals help break down the compost material. They come from the soil or old compost you add and from the earth on which the compost heap is built.

    What should I put in my compost?

    Most organic materials which decompose readily are suitable for use in a compost heap. For best results, chop or grind coarse material to speed breakdown.

    Greens

    • Garden wastes – Grass cuttings, non-woody garden prunings, leaves, flowers and vegetable remains.
    • Seaweed
    • Kitchen wastes – Vegetable peelings, leaves and stalks, fruit peelings and cores, cooked table scraps, tea leaves, coffee grounds, egg shells and stale bread.
    • Animal manure – Horse, chicken or cow manure (but avoid other animal droppings).

    Browns

    • Paper and cardboard – Include small amounts of shredded newspaper and paper tissues.
    • Wood fire ash
    • Sawdust and wood shavings
    • Vacuum dust and hair

    What should I leave out of my compost?

    • Woody garden clippings – Branches, roots (unless chipped), rose cuttings and other garden wastes with thorns or nettles, conifer prunings or pine needles.
    • Treated wood products
    • Weeds with bulbs such as nut grass and oxalis
    • Diseased plant material – Put these in the rubbish bin
    • Septic tank sludge or toilet waste
    • Meat scraps (which can attract rats and mice) and diseased animal carcasses
    • Animal droppings – Cat and dog droppings can spread disease
    • Any wastes that do not decompose – Metals, glass and plastics.
    • Materials that kill the composting bacteria – Fat, oil, salt, disinfectants, antibiotics, herbicides, pesticides, waste recently sprayed with pesticides.

    How does composting work?

    When making compost, the aim should be to provide air, some moisture and suitable food in the right proportions to keep micro-organisms busy.

    When suitable material is collected in a loose heap, naturally occurring micro-organisms such as bacteria, fungi and algae start to feed on the softer, more succulent ingredients. At this stage, the heap can heat up to 60

  • DrumMuster

    DrumMUSTER is a national environmental program for the collection and recycling of empty, cleaned, non-returnable crop production and on-farm animal health chemical containers. The responsible use of chemicals, and waste management initiatives means a cleaner environment for the community as a whole and adds to Australia's clean and green image. Drummuster is held at the [...]

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    DrumMUSTER is a national environmental program for the collection and recycling of empty, cleaned, non-returnable crop production and on-farm animal health chemical containers. The responsible use of chemicals, and waste management initiatives means a cleaner environment for the community as a whole and adds to Australia’s clean and green image.

    Drummuster is held at the Ayr Transfer Station on the 1st Wednesday of every month from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

    Appointments are required and can be made by contacting Council’s Customer Service Centre on (07) 4783 9800

    A DrumMuster collection is also held at the Clare Waste Transfer Station. If you live in the Clare area contact Joanna Marchioni on 0407 827 155 for bookings.

    Drum Muster is now available at:
    Home Hill Transfer Station – during opening hours, no appointment necessary.

    Giru Transfer Station – during opening hours, no appointment necessary.

    DrumMUSTER Makes it Easy

    Recycling your eligible farm chemical containers with drumMUSTER is easy – all you need to do is follow these simple steps:

    • Triple or pressure rinse your chemical containers IMMEDIATELY after use.
    • Pour the RINSE WATER back into your spray tank.
    • Make sure ALL chemical residue is removed.
    • REMOVE LIDS to allow your containers to DRY thoroughly. Take lids SEPARATELY to collections.
    • Metal containers should be PUNCTURED from the top through the bottom.
    • DELIVER your eligible clean empty containers to your local drumMUSTER collection centre.

    For details on drumMUSTER colections in your area contact your local Council or visit the drumMUSTER website at: www.drummuster.com.au

    Cleaning Tips

    The following tips will help to ensure your difficult-to-clean eligible farm chemical containers will be accepted for recycling at your local drumMUSTER collection centre.

    Suspension concentrates

    (Atrazine, Simazine, etc)

    • Rinse your container immediately after use to ensure any chemical residue does not dry.
    • Use methylated spirits to remove dried residue. If this doesn’t work, fill the container with water and soak for at least 24 hours before rinsing.

    Oil-based chemicals

    (ULVs, LVs)

    • Follow specific instructions on the product label or contact the manufacturer for further assistance

    Other chemical residues

    • Rinse container immediately after use as all chemical residues are much harder to remove when dry
    • Some containers may require additional rinsing (more than three rinses)
    • A brush or high pressure hose may be required to clean stubborn or dried chemical residue.
    • Elligible containers with dirt, rust and dye stains are not considered hazardous and are therefore accepted at drumMUSTER collection centres.

    Triple Rinsing (a three stage rinsing process)

    1. Empty the contents of the container into the spray tank and allow the container to drain for an extra 30 seconds after the flow reduces to drops.
    2. Fill the container with clean water between 20% and 25% of its capacity and replace the cap securely
    3. Shake, rotate, roll or invert the container vigorusly for at least 30 seconds, so that the rinse water reaches all inside surfaces.
    4. Pour the rinsate (the rinsing water from step 3) into the spray tank. Let it drain for an extra 30 seconds after the flow reduces to drops.
    5. Repeat until the container has been rinsed three times.

    For animal dips add the rinsate to the dip or medicated water.

    For animal drenches dispose of the rinsate in a disposal pit specifically marked and set up for this purpose, clear of waterways, desirable vegetation and tree roots.

  • E-Waste

    E-waste which includes tvs, monitors and computers can be taken to Ayr Waste Transfer Station free of charge.

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    What is E-Waste

    E-waste is another name for electronic waste. Some of these E-Waste materials listed below can be taken to the Ayr waste transfer station free of charge. Many of these materials contain metals and components which are not suitable to place into landfill. Recyling the materials will prevent the contaminants going to landfill.

    E-waste is collected and recycled as part of the National Product Stewardship Program

    E-Waste accepted at Ayr Waste Transfer Station

    Televsions

    Plasma televisions

    Cathode Ray Tube  (CRT) televisions

    Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) televisions

    Rear Projection televisions

    Computer Equipment

    portable processing machines – ie laptops, notebooks & palm computers

    desktops/central processing units (CPUs)

    Computer monitors

    Printers

    Muliti function devices that print, copy, scan and/or fax

    cards, motherboards

    web cameras

    compact disk drives

    digital video disk drives

    hard drives

    floppy drives

    mouse and trackball

    scanners

    keyboards

    joysticks and gamepads

    electrical transformers designed to be housed in same cabinet as the CPU

     

     

     

  • Recycling cartridges

    Burdekin Shire Council has two receptacles in the foyer at the council chambers at 145 Young Street, Ayr for Shire residents to dispose of used ink and printing cartridges. These cartridges are then sent for recycling.

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    Burdekin Shire Council has two receptacles in the foyer at the council chambers at 145 Young Street, Ayr for Shire residents to dispose of used ink and printing cartridges.

    These cartridges are then sent for recycling.

Who to Contact

For further information on recycling please use any of the following contact methods and a Customer Service Officer will be able to help.

Please contact the Customer Service Centre using the Online Contact Form.

You can also contact the Customer Service Centre using one of the following methods.

Customer Service Centre
Location145 Young Street,
Ayr QLD 4807
Postal AddressPO Box 974
Ayr QLD 4807
Opening hours8am – 5pm, Monday to Friday (except Public Holidays)
Phone(07) 4783 9800 – Business hours
(07) 4783 9800 – After hours (the same number)
Fax(07) 4783 9999
SMS0437 886 008
Email
OnlineUse the Online Contact Form
 
Building Certification and Plumbing Officers
Early OpeningPlease phone (07) 4783 9942 if you need access the Building and Plumbing Department between 7am – 8am, Monday to Friday.
 
Media Enquiries
For all media enquiries please email
 
Compliments and Complaints
The Burdekin Shire Council is committed to an open and friendly relationship with members of our community.  Whether you’re telling us what we do well, or how we can improve, your feedback is important to us.If you would like to provide a compliment or complaint regarding actions or decisions made by Council, or by one of our councillors or officers, please visit the
> Complaints, compliments and suggestions page.

Privacy Notice

We will only use personal information provided in your email to address the subject matter of your email. This may involve passing on your email to other areas within the council. We will not disclose your personal information to other government agencies, organisations or anyone else unless one of the following applies:

  • you consented to the disclosure
  • you would have a reasonable expectation that your personal information would be disclosed
  • it is required or authorised by law
  • it will prevent or lessen a serious threat to somebody’s life or health; and
  • the disclosure is reasonably necessary for a law enforcement activity.

Your email address details will not be added to a mailing list. Email messages may be monitored by our information technology staff for system trouble-shooting and maintenance purposes.

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