Animals and Pet Management

The primary aim of this unit is to work with the community, encouraging responsible pet ownership through public education programs and working together co-operatively with the community to achieve an amicable co-existing neighbourhood for all residents.

This includes Animal Approvals, Animal Registration and dealing with Lost and Found Animals.

  • Dog and Cat Cartoon

    Animal Registration

    Animal registration is designed to promote responsible pet ownership. The registration also provides safety and security to your cat or dog, you and the community. Animal Registration renewal notices are sent out in June each year and a discount is available to anyone paying their animal registration by 31 July. If you have not received your renewal notice yet please contact Council.

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    Animal registration is designed to promote responsible pet ownership. The registration also provides safety and security to your cat or dog, you and the community.

    Dog and Cat Registration Fees

    The only animals currently required to be registered with Council are cats and dogs. However, you may require an approval (permit) from Council to keep other types of animals.

    Why should you register your Animal?

    The Queensland Government introduced legislation in 2008 to make the registration of all dogs and cats compulsory.  A recent amendment to this legislation has removed the State-wide requirement for cat registration and has given local government the power to decide whether they wish to continue with cat registration.  Burdekin Shire Council now has until 1 July 2014 to draft a new local law requiring cat registration.

    Animal registration aims to:

    1. Make it easier to re-unite lost animals with their owners.
    2. Provide vital animal identification in the event of a disease outbreak.
    3. Provide statistics to help councils to provide appropriate management strategies and facilities.
    4. Promote responsible pet ownership throughout the community.
    5. Reduce the numbers of unwanted pets.

    The following are requirements of owning a dog or cat in the Burdekin Shire

    1. Upon taking ownership of a dog or cat, animal owners must ensure that it is registered with Burdekin Shire Council within 14 days.
    2. An owner of a dog or cat is required by law to inform Council of any changes to their details within seven (7) days.
    3. All dogs and cats are to be registered whether they are in a rural or non rural area with the exception of working dogs. (The terms ‘working dog’ is defined in the Animal Management (Cats and Dogs) Act 2008. See Fact Sheet)
    4. Registration falls due in the month of July each year, with renewal notices issued in June.
    5. Irresponsible owners who fail to register their animals with Council will face significant penalties including on-the-spot fines of $220 per animal.

    To save time, you can download the Animal Registration form to complete at home before returning it, with the registration fee and any supporting documentation, to Council.

    Fees

    1. A discount of 50% is offered to owners who register their pets during July.
    2. From 1 August to 31 January full registration fees apply.  Pro rata registration for new registrations only is offered at 50% of the full fee from the 1st of February the following year until the 30th of June.
    3. Discounted fees also apply for desexed animals, microchipped animals, and if the owner is a current Queensland pension concession card holder.
    4. From 1 July 2014, to encourage cat owners to microchip and desex their cats, Council has introduced free registration for desexed, microchipped cats.  Registration is still required and the owner will be required to purchase any new or replacement tags.
    5. The fee for a new animal registration includes the provision of an identification tag.
    6. Burdekin Shire uses a permanent tag system with a unique registration number assigned to each animal for their life span.  Animals should wear registration tags at all times (it’s important to regularly check that your pet’s tag is visible and undamaged).
    7. Replacement tags are available from Council Chambers or the Home Hill Library for a fee.
    8. Registration can be paid at the following locations:
      • Council Chambers – 145 Young Street, Ayr
      • Home Hill Library – Ninth Avenue, Home Hill
      • BPAY – for renewal of registration only (see renewal notice for details)
      • Australia Post - for renewal of registration only (see renewal notice for details)
    9. Please note that if you pay by BPay or at Australia Post and you have any changes to your details you will have to contact Council or return the updated form to Council.
    10. A dog or cat that was born on or after 1 July 2010 must be implanted with a microchip by 12 weeks of age and the microchip number must be provided to Council.
    11. Regulated dogs, including dangerous dogs, menacing dogs and restricted dog breeds, have additional registration requirements.  Please check with Council for specific details.
    12. Working dogs (kept on rural land by a person who works as a cattle producer) are exempt from registration provided adequate proof of their status can be shown.
    13. If your animal dies you are able to make application for a refund from Council. The amount you are refunded depends on Council’s pro rata fee as per Council’s fees and charges.
    14. Current registration fees can be found by viewing Council’s fees and charges.

    Further information

    To register your animal contact Council’s Customer Service Centre on (07) 4783 9800 or email

    To save time, you can download the Animal Registation form to complete at home before returning it, with the registration fee and any supporting documentation, to Council.

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    Animal Services from other Agencies

    Council's role in animal matters focuses on the requirements for keeping certain animals, mainly as pets with a strong focus on cats and dogs. Council also has a role in assisting with problems with some pest animals, for details on these please see Council's webpages on Land Protection. It is the responsiblity of other agencies to provide assistance in relation to welfare issues and for the care of wildlife.

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    Council’s role in animal matters focuses on the requirements for keeping certain animals, mainly as pets with a strong focus on cats and dogs.  Council also has a role in assisting with problems with some pest animals, for details on these please see Council’s webpages on Land Protection.

    It is the responsiblity of other agencies to provide assistance in relation to welfare issues and for the care of wildlife. 

    Queensland Parks and Wildlife Services
    Phone 4796 7777
    Please ring for any additional information regarding possums or magpies.

    RSPCA
    Cruelty complaints only 1300 852 188 or (07) 3426 9971
    Non Urgent enquiries (07) 3426 9999
    Lost and Found 1300 363 736

    RSPCA Animal Shelter
    Phone 4774 5130
    RSPCA

    Wildlife Preservation Society of QLD
    Phone 3221 0194
    Website: www.wildlife.org.au
    Email:

    If you have any further queries or are unsure about who to contact please do not hesitate to contact Council’s Customer Service Centre on 4783 9800 or

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    Animals – Lost and Found

    Please contact Council for further information regarding any lost or found animals on (07) 4783 9800.

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    Please contact the Council for further information regarding release of animals on (07) 4783 9800.

    View the release fees for animals in the pound.

  • Birds including Poultry

    To try and minimise the nuisance effects from birds Council has introduced minimum standards for keeping all animals as well as some extra requirements for various types of birds. Certain birds are not allowed to be kept or can only be kept with the approval of Council.

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    Council receives a number of complaints each year in relation to birds being kept by neighbours. To try and minimse the nuisance effects from birds Council has introduced minimum standards for keeping all animals as well as some extra requirements for various types of birds.  Certain birds are not allowed to be kept or can only be kept with the approval of Council. 

    Nuisance aspects for birds including poultry
    Council receives a number of complaints each year in relation to:
    - Smelly chicken coops; and
    - Noisy cockatoos or roosters

    To try and minimise this residents are not allowed to have noisy birds on properties under a certain size and there are minimum standards for keeping the birds.

    If you are experiencing problems with noise or how a neighbour is keeping their birds please contact Council’s Customer Service Centre on telephone 4783 9800 to lodge a request.  Council’s Compliance Officers will then follow-up with the owner of the bird/s. 

    Please note that animal noise complaints may require further assistance from you such as the completion of a diary to log when the noise occurs.

    Approval to keep certain birds including poultry

    An approval from Council is required to keep certain birds on some properties.  The requirements are specified in Schedules 1 and 2 of Subordinate Local Law No. 2 (Animal Management) 2012 can help you answer this question. Details are also available on our webpage Approval to keep Animals.  

    Please note that you will need to know the size of the allotment where the bird/s are to be kept.

    Minimum requirements for keeping birds

    Minimum standards have been set for keeping all animals.  Specific requiremnts have also been provided for certain animals including birds. For more information please refer to fact sheets or Schedules 4 and 5 of Subordinate Local Law 2 (Animal Management) 2012.
     

    Further information
    For further information on birds and poultry….

    Please contact the Customer Service Centre using the Online Contact Form.

    You can also contact the Customer Service Centre using one of the following methods.

    Customer Service Centre
    Location145 Young Street,
    Ayr QLD 4807
    Postal AddressPO Box 974
    Ayr QLD 4807
    Opening hours8am – 5pm, Monday to Friday (except Public Holidays)
    Phone(07) 4783 9800 – Business hours
    (07) 4783 9800 – After hours (the same number)
    Fax(07) 4783 9999
    SMS0437 886 008
    Email
    OnlineUse the Online Contact Form
     
    Building Certification and Plumbing Officers
    Early OpeningPlease phone (07) 4783 9942 if you need access the Building and Plumbing Department between 7am – 8am, Monday to Friday.
  • Local Cat

    Cats

    Registration  Under the Animal Management (Cats and Dogs) Act 2008 all cats are required to be registered with Council, once the cat is over 3 months of age. Cats must also be registered within 14 days of obtaining your cat or within 14 days of moving into the Burdekin Shire. All cats born on or after [...]

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    Registration 

    Under the Animal Management (Cats and Dogs) Act 2008 all cats are required to be registered with Council, once the cat is over 3 months of age. Cats must also be registered within 14 days of obtaining your cat or within 14 days of moving into the Burdekin Shire.

    All cats born on or after 1 July 2010 must also be micro-chipped.

    An approval is required if more than 2 cats over 3 months of age are to be kept on the one property.  The approval is to be received prior to receiving the additional cat/s.

    Why should you register your cat?

    1. When registered an identification tag is provided.  By wearing this tag lost cats can be reunited with their owners.
    2. Cat identification will be vital in the event of a disease outbreak.
    3. Information on registration provides statistics to help Councils provide appropriate management strategies and facilities.

    What is the Registration Period and Fees?

    • The period of registration for dogs is for twelve (12) months from 1st August to the 31st July the following year.
    • An Early Bird discounted registration fee is available for all new registrations and renewals if paid within the period of 1st July to 31st July.
    • Discounted registration fees are available for cats that have been desexed and micro-chipped.
    • Council actively encourages residents to voluntarily have their cats desexed, and to identify them by a collar and tag distributed by Council after registration, and a microchip. It is necessary to ensure your cat is controlled to prevent nuisance wandering and to protect wildlife in our shire.

    Can I receive a refund on my cat registration?

    Council has a Policy to allow certain pro-rata refunds for cat registrations during the registration period.

    Cat owners are able to make application to Council if their cat dies, or if the family relocates away from Burdekin shire.

  • Dead Animals

    While Council deals with dead animals on Council property, any dead animals on the Highway are under the jurisdiction of the Department of Main Roads but Council will take any requests and pass the request through to Councils Main Roads Department.

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    Dead animals on Council property, e.g. on roads and footpaths, can be reported to Council for collection and disposal by a Compliance Officer.

    While Council deals with dead animals on Council property, any dead animals on the highway are under the jurisdiction of the Department of Transport and Main Roads. Council will take any requests and forward them on to the Department for you.

    For further information
    If you would like to report a dead animal please call Council’s Customer Service Centre on (07) 4783 9800 or email

  • Desexing Your Pet

    Each year, more than 200 stray dogs are handled by Burdekin Shire Council.Most of these dogs are not desexed. Many are litters of crossbreed pups from parents left to wander the street and breed at will. Such animals only add to the flood of unwanted animals the Burdekin Shire Council and the RSPCA are trying to cope with.Research into the reasons for pet ownership have shown that only 5% of pet owners have a pet for breeding purposes. Therefore only 5% of pets need to be left entire. In reality, 30% of female dogs and 85% of male dogs are not desexed.

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    Each year, more than 200 stray dogs are handled by Burdekin Shire Council.

    Most of these dogs are not desexed. Many are litters of crossbreed pups from parents left to wander the street and breed at will. Such animals only add to the flood of unwanted animals the Burdekin Shire Council and the RSPCA are trying to cope with.

    Research into the reasons for pet ownership have shown that only 5% of pet owners have a pet for breeding purposes. Therefore only 5% of pets need to be left entire. In reality, 30% of female dogs and 85% of male dogs are not desexed.

    It is natural for a dog to breed but it is certainly not natural for a dog to live in the bustling confusion of a busy suburb.

    Why have my dog desexed?

    To make dogs happy in our suburban rat-race, we need to train them, to fence them and, most importantly, to desex them. These requirements benefit both the dog and the community.

    Desexing has advantages for your pet.

    Firstly, female dogs that are spayed do not have the continual strain of litters depleting their body of essential nutrients.

    Secondly, male dogs and females in season look for a mate. Female dogs that are spayed and male dogs that are castrated do not roam the suburbs to the same extent.

    During such neighbourhood jaunts, these dogs can be baited, hit by cars, or lost. Desexed dogs are less likely to suffer such a fate.

    Thirdly, male dogs are less aggressive and less territorial if castrated and therefore are less likely to suffer wounds from fighting.

    In addition, female dogs that have been desexed are much less likely to develop the dog equivalent of breast cancer.

    Desexing dogs reduces the number of unwanted, stray and abandoned animals. With fewer strays, our footpaths and parks are cleaner under foot.

    Should a dog have a litter before being desexed?

    The biggest myth is that a female animal should be allowed to have a litter before it is desexed. There is no truth to this at all.

    There is absolutely no advantage in allowing an animal to have a litter before having it desexed. It does not make it more tranquil or more mature, it only adds to our stray problem.

    It is not advisable to try to recoup the cost of the pet through breeding. Essential pet care procedures such as vaccinations, worming of the litter and correct feeding will only add to the cost.

    The best age to have a dog desexed is between six and nine months.

    Dogs are amazing creatures. Desexing is a major surgical process which, in humans, would entail bed rest for days or weeks. However when your pooch is desexed you can expect it to be bounding about quite normally the day after surgery.

    Further information
    For more information on the benefits of desexing your pet please contact Council’s Customer Service Centre of 4783 9800 or email  or contact your local vet.

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    Dogs

    Having pets is a basic right for Burdekin residents and one of the great joys of our community, but everyone who owns an animal must be aware of the responsibility it brings as well as the community's expectations about responsible pet management. Owning a pet is great fun, but it does come with responsibility. Much of being a responsible pet owner is understanding your pet's needs and being aware of your responsibilities to the community.

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    Pets are part of the famiy in 63% of the 7.5 million households in Australia. (Source: RSPCA) Owning and caring for a pet comes with responsibility to the animal, your family and the community.  As well as feeding and exercising your dog you have a responsiblity to ensure it doesn’t cause a problem to others. 

    Councils each year deal with thousands of complaints in relation to dogs that bark, wander, are lost and those that attack or act aggressive.  Many of these problems could be addressed by being a repsonsible owner.  

    As the owner you should:
    - train your dog;
    - walk it on a lead;
    - socialise it with other dogs;
    - pick up after it when you take it for a walk (always carry a bag); and
    - listen and act when neighbours tell you it barks or howls when you are away.

    The information provided here will help you with caring for your pet, making you aware of your responsiblities as well as Council’s potential involvement in animal management issues.

  • Other Animals

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  • Property Hygiene – Animal Related

    Burdekin Shire Council's Local Law No. 4 (Keeping and Control of Animals) prescribes a minimum set of standards for the keeping of animals.

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    Overview

    Burdekin Shire Council’s Local Law No. 4 (Keeping and Control of Animals) prescribes a minimum set of standards for the keeping of animals or a particular species of animals.

    Details

    To ensure the welfare of animals are maintained, Council requires the following minimum standards to be provided:-

    Keeping of Animals in General

    • Require the regular cleaning of enclosures and the disposal of animals waste;
    • Required adequate provision of food and water;
    • Require the provision of adequate space for the animals;
    • Provide for the separation of enclosures in which animals are kept from places used for human habitation or the preparation of food or from watercourses or water catchments areas; and
    • Make other provisionsor the maintenance of proper standards of cleanliness and hygiene

    Keeping of Birds in Enclosures

    • The provision and access of adequate shelter, clean drinking water and appropriate food;
    • Waste waters from enclosure to be drained in a nuisance free manner;
    • Any excreta, offensive material or food scraps must be collected at least once each day and placed into an approved fly-proof refuse receptacle for disposal;
    • The provision of a proper enclosure to confine the birds/poultry at all times;
    • A pen/aviary must be sited a distance from an habitable dwelling that ensures that noise, odourand infestation of vermin does not impact on that residence;
    • Any enclosure which includes an open fenced area, must be sited a minimum distance of 1500mm from the allotment boundaries; and
    • The use of lime maybe beneficial to reduce odour problems which are created from the poultry enclosure.

    Who to Contact

    If you are aware of anyone who may not be maintaining the minimum standards of animal related property hygiene please contact Council’s Customer Service Centre on (07) 4783 9800 or email

 

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