Dogs

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Pets are part of the famiy in 63% of the 7.5 million households in Australia. (Source: RSPCA) Owning and caring for a pet comes with responsibility to the animal, your family and the community.  As well as feeding and exercising your dog you have a responsiblity to ensure it doesn’t cause a problem to others. 

Councils each year deal with thousands of complaints in relation to dogs that bark, wander, are lost and those that attack or act aggressive.  Many of these problems could be addressed by being a repsonsible owner.  

As the owner you should:
- train your dog;
- walk it on a lead;
- socialise it with other dogs;
- pick up after it when you take it for a walk (always carry a bag); and
- listen and act when neighbours tell you it barks or howls when you are away.

The information provided here will help you with caring for your pet, making you aware of your responsiblities as well as Council’s potential involvement in animal management issues.

  • Responsible Pet Ownership

    Are You a Responsible Dog Owner?

    DO's Ask about Council Local Laws. Register your dog and make sure it wears its tag at all times, this may save its life. Buy your dog a good leash and collar and use it. Advise Council if your dog changes owners or if there is a change of address. Desex your dog. Do not [...]

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    DO’s

    Ask about Council Local Laws.

    Register your dog and make sure it wears its tag at all times, this may save its life.

    Buy your dog a good leash and collar and use it.

    Advise Council if your dog changes owners or if there is a change of address.

    Desex your dog. Do not contribute to the over supply of dogs. Desexing will make your dog healthier, more affectionate and home loving.

    Supervise the children and the dog when playing together.

    Teach your children responsibility towards their dog.

    See that your dog has regular meals and plenty of fresh water.

    Wash your dog’s bowl out prior to filling it.

    Brush your dog regularly to remove tangles and to prevent matting of hair, particularly longhaired dogs.

    Bath your dog fortnightly or when necessary using a mild pure soap. Choose a warm day free from wind and dry your dog thoroughly.

    Exercise your dog every day.

    Go to the vet if your dog is sick.

    Train your dog. Take it to training classes and stick with it, once or twice is not enough. An untrained dog can be a nuisance.

    Vaccinate your dog and make sure it receives an annual booster. Distemper, Hepatitis and Parvovirus are killers. Consult your vet.

    Consult your vet about Heartworm. It’s a problem in dogs.

    Ensure your dog has a cool place in which to lie especially in summer.

    Treat your dog for ticks.

    Ensure your dog is properly looked after when you are absent or go on holidays.

    Remember dog faeces are annoying, offensive and can be dangerous to human health. Please clean up after your dog when in public, walking the dog and at home.

    Remember if your bitch comes in season it may cause chaos in your area if you do not know how to cope. If you need help or advice, ask your vet.  It is recommended that dogs on heat be kept secure in your property.

    DONT’s

    Obtain a dog unless your property has a suitable enclosure.

    Let children torment your dog.

    Allow your dog to wander.

    Allow your dog to make excessive noise.

    Have more than 2 dogs on a house block without prior approval from Council. If you are in a unit please discuss with Council prior to getting a dog.

  • Barking Dogs

    All dogs bark, but some barking dogs become a real neighbourhood nuisance.

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    All dogs bark, but some barking dogs become a real neighbourhood nuisance – greatly reducing the quality of life for their neighbours and increasing neighbourhood tensions. Barking dogs is the most common animal behaviour problem Council is asked to deal with. Ongoing barking is often a symptom of another problem, and taking time to understand what makes dogs bark – especially your pet or other dogs in your neighbourhood – is the first step towards solving this problem, both for the dog involved and your neighbours.

    Why Dogs Bark:

    • Often bark when they are lonely
    • Separation from an owner
    • Boredom and frustration
    • Seeking attention
    • Fear of people, objects or other dogs
    • Threat to territory
    • Some breeds have a reputation for barking

    You Can Control Barking:

    • Walk your dog to relieve boredom
    • Provide stimulants such as balls and chew toys
    • Leave a radio on or leave one of your old shoes
    • Give your dog a bone when you leave the house
    • Construct a fence designed to restrict your dog’s vision
    • Obedience training and discipline

    Excessive Barking:

    • 7am-10pm no more than six minutes of noise in any hour
    • 10pm-7am no more than three minutes of noise in any 30-minute period
    • Excessive barking is an offence and Council staff will respond to reported barking problems. Initially, the owner will receive an administrative letter.
    • If the problem continues and further complaints are reported, the Council will investigate.

    My Neighbour’s dog barks – what can I do?

    Talk to your neighbour as soon as the problem arises. They may not be aware that their dog is barking or that their dog’s barking is bothering you.

    Give your neighbour information and if the barking persists after a week or two, speak with your neighbour again to provide feedback.

    If your neighbour is unapproachable, or does not agree that a problem exists, you should contact Concil for further advice.

    Council investigation

    Excessive barking is an offence and Council staff suggest that if you believe a barking problem exists in your immediate neighbourhood and the above options have not worked out, Council can be called on to investigate a barking dog to see if the barking is excessive. Initially, the owner of the dog will receive an administrative letter and barking dog information sheet.

    If the problem continues and further complaints are reported, the Council will investigate. The cooperation of the dog owner will be sought to stop the nuisance. If noise continues, you will be asked to keep a diary of dates and times when the dog barks. You must be able to confirm that it is that particular dog which is barking. If the barking persists, Council officers will conduct a survey of other homes in the area to gather additional evidence. People who are affected by the barking must be willing to testify under oath in an open court of the existence of a nuisance and be able to identify the animal causing the nuisance.

    Council is responsible for ensuring the welfare of the general community and, if your dog’s barking is found to be creating an ongoing nuisance, you may have to remove your dog from the property. Irresponsible owners who fail to comply with Council recommendations will face significant penalties including infringements fines.

    Council staff can help you with barking problems in the community so that you do not have to suffer the nuisance caused by dogs that make too much noise.

    Further information

    To report a barking dog…

    Please contact the Customer Service Centre using the Online Contact Form.

    You can also contact the Customer Service Centre using one of the following methods.

    Customer Service Centre
    Location145 Young Street,
    Ayr QLD 4807
    Postal AddressPO Box 974
    Ayr QLD 4807
    Opening hours8am – 5pm, Monday to Friday (except Public Holidays)
    Phone(07) 4783 9800 – Business hours
    (07) 4783 9800 – After hours (the same number)
    Fax(07) 4783 9999
    SMS0437 886 008
    Email
    OnlineUse the Online Contact Form
    Building Certification and Plumbing Officers
    Early OpeningPlease phone (07) 4783 9942 if you need access the Building and Plumbing Department between 7am – 8am, Monday to Friday.
    Media Enquiries
    For all media enquiries please email
    Compliments and Complaints
    The Burdekin Shire Council is committed to an open and friendly relationship with members of our community.  Whether you’re telling us what we do well, or how we can improve, your feedback is important to us.

    If you would like to provide a compliment or complaint regarding actions or decisions made by Council, or by one of our councillors or officers, please visit the
    > Complaints, compliments and suggestions page.

    Privacy Notice

    We will only use personal information provided in your email to address the subject matter of your email. This may involve passing on your email to other areas within the council. We will not disclose your personal information to other government agencies, organisations or anyone else unless one of the following applies:

    • you consented to the disclosure
    • you would have a reasonable expectation that your personal information would be disclosed
    • it is required or authorised by law
    • it will prevent or lessen a serious threat to somebody’s life or health; and
    • the disclosure is reasonably necessary for a law enforcement activity.

    Your emal address details will not be added to a mailing list. Email messages may be monitored by our information technology staff for system trouble-shooting and maintenance purposes.

  • Dangerous and Menacing Dogs

    Council may declare your dog 'dangerous' if it has attacked a person or animal, or repeatedly threatened to attack, or menacing if they have caused fear.

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    Council may declare your dog ‘dangerous’ or ‘menacing’ if it has attacked a person or animal, or threatened to attack and caused fear. The Animal Management (Cats and Dogs) Act 2008 provides Council with the ability to categorise dogs based on the severity of an attack. 
    A serious attack, causing bodily harm or fear allows the dog to be declared dangerous.  A dog can be declared menacing if the attack or fear is not considered serious.  If a Council Officer is of the opinion that the dog due to previous behaviour is likely to attack or cause fear then the dog can also be declared.

    Process for Declaring a Dog Dangerous or Menacing

    Council undertakes an investigation following the receival of a complaint of an incident or attack.  The owner of the dog allegedly involved in the incident is asked to provide a statement as are any witnesses and the complainant.  Once the investigation is complete a decision is made whether to declare the dog dangerous, menacing or not to declare the dog at all.

    If Council proposes to declare the dog the owner then receives a notice advising of the proposal and offering them an opportuinty to respond in writing. 

    If Council continues with the declaration an Information Notice is issued and the owner will have 21 days to comply with all of the conditions, including paying a higher registration fee for each declared dog.

    During this time the owner of the dog may apply for an Internal Review of the decision to declare the dog.  The application form is provided with the Information Notice and the owner has 14 days to lodge the review.  It is important to note that lodging the review does not stop the requirement to comply with the conditions.

    When a decision is made on the Internal Review applciation a Review Notice is issued to the owner advising of the outcome.  If the owner is not happy with the outcome they can lodge an External Review through Queensland Civil and Administrative Tribunal.

    Conditions for Keepng Dangerous or Menacing Dogs

    Once your dog is declared either dangerous or menacing strict conditions are imposed.  A number of conditions are imposed including:

    • The dog must be kept witihn an enclosure that meets strict requriements including construction materials, height requriements based on weight of the dog, self closing and self latching gates and secure access to the front door for any visitor.  
    • Erect signs on your property, which say ‘Declared Dangerous Dog’ or ‘Declared menacing Dog’;
    • Leash your dog at all times when outside your property (there are no exceptions) and if the dog ahs been declared dangerous it is also to be muzzled to prevent biting;
    • Ensure your dog is securely held by means of a collar and leash by a person over 16 years of age (only one dog to be held by this person at one time);
    • A dangerous dog can also not be allowed to breed and must be desexed;
    • The dog is not to be relocated or given away without notifying Council.

    These are just some of the conditions, a full list is available from the Additional Information section on this page. 

    If the owner of a declared dangerous dog or declared menacing dog does not comply with the conditions Council may either:

    • Issue fines for $770
    • Seize the dog; or
    • Commence legal action (maximum penalty $8250) 

    Registration Fees

    The registration fees for declared dogs are significantly higher than for general registration.  The fees in 2012-2013 are:
    Dangerous Dog:  $310
    Entire Menacing Dog:  $300
    Desexed Menacing Dog: $210

    For further information:

    Please contact the Customer Service Centre using the Online Contact Form.

    You can also contact the Customer Service Centre using one of the following methods.

    Customer Service Centre
    Location145 Young Street,
    Ayr QLD 4807
    Postal AddressPO Box 974
    Ayr QLD 4807
    Opening hours8am – 5pm, Monday to Friday (except Public Holidays)
    Phone(07) 4783 9800 – Business hours
    (07) 4783 9800 – After hours (the same number)
    Fax(07) 4783 9999
    SMS0437 886 008
    Email
    OnlineUse the Online Contact Form
    Building Certification and Plumbing Officers
    Early OpeningPlease phone (07) 4783 9942 if you need access the Building and Plumbing Department between 7am – 8am, Monday to Friday.
    Media Enquiries
    For all media enquiries please email
    Compliments and Complaints
    The Burdekin Shire Council is committed to an open and friendly relationship with members of our community.  Whether you’re telling us what we do well, or how we can improve, your feedback is important to us.

    If you would like to provide a compliment or complaint regarding actions or decisions made by Council, or by one of our councillors or officers, please visit the
    > Complaints, compliments and suggestions page.

    Privacy Notice

    We will only use personal information provided in your email to address the subject matter of your email. This may involve passing on your email to other areas within the council. We will not disclose your personal information to other government agencies, organisations or anyone else unless one of the following applies:

    • you consented to the disclosure
    • you would have a reasonable expectation that your personal information would be disclosed
    • it is required or authorised by law
    • it will prevent or lessen a serious threat to somebody’s life or health; and
    • the disclosure is reasonably necessary for a law enforcement activity.

    Your emal address details will not be added to a mailing list. Email messages may be monitored by our information technology staff for system trouble-shooting and maintenance purposes.

  • Dog Attacks

    Being bitten or attacked by a dog can produce serious physical, psychological and emotional effects, not only for the person who is attacked but also for the owner of the attacking dog. Even if the victim is not bitten, the threat of the attack can cause lasting trauma. Think how you would feel if you were the victim?

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    Overview

    Being bitten or attacked by a dog can produce serious physical, psychological and emotional effects, not only for the person who is attacked but also for the owner of the attacking dog.  Even if the victim is not bitten, the threat of the attack can cause lasting trauma. How  would you feel if you were the victim?

    Responsibility

    Aggressive dogs are often a sign of irresponsible ownership.  Pet owners are always responsible and legally liable for the actions of their animals.  Aggressive animals have no place in public areas unless under close and direct supervision. 

    Under the Animal Management (Cats and Dogs) Act 2008 dogs that act aggressively and cause fear as well as those that attack and cause injury or death may be declared menacing or dangerous. If the declaration proceeds the declared dog must be kept under strict conditions and higher registration fees will also apply.

    Tips

    Here are some tips for responsible ownership of your dog and to reduce the chances of your dog being in a situation where it might become aggressive:-

    • Always supervise children around dogs. Dog play can become rough and may sometimes result in a bite. Constantly monitor your children when a dog is around and never leave babies or young children alone with a dog;
    • Keep children away from a dog if it is sleeping, feeding (especially chewing a bone) or if recovering from an illness or injury;
    • Always check to see that your fencing or dog enclosure is secure.  Keeping your dog confined will greatly lessen the risk to others in the community; and
    • Always use a leash when walking your dog in public.

    If attacked….

    If you or your pet are unfortunate enough to be attacked or bitten by an aggressive you should report the following details to Council immediately:-

    • Your name and address;
    • The date, time and location of the attack;
    • A full description of the dog (eg. colour, breed, size);
    • The identity and address of the owner of the dog (if possible).

    Following an investigation if the dog and it’s owner have been identified Council may declare the dog as dangerous or menacing, issue fines and/or seize the dog.

    Fees

    Currenty the annual registration fee for a declared dog is:

    Dangerous:  $310

    Menacing: $300 (if desexed) or $210 (if entire)

    For further information, please contact Council’s Customer Service Centre on (07) 4783 9800 or email

  • Give Your Dog a Bone… Sometimes

    To a dog, there is nothing as pleasurable as a wholesome bone. Generally speaking, bones are good for dogs. They are excellent source of protein and minerals and they perform the very useful function of keeping a dog's teeth free from scale. To my mind the biggest advantage of a meaty bone is that dogs [...]

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    To a dog, there is nothing as pleasurable as a wholesome bone. Generally speaking, bones are good for dogs.

    They are excellent source of protein and minerals and they perform the very useful function of keeping a dog’s teeth free from scale. To my mind the biggest advantage of a meaty bone is that dogs enjoy them so much. So often our domesticated dogs lead dull lives. They lay in the back yard for hours with little to interest them. No wonder they leap into a paroxysm of barking whenever a stranger or another dog walks past the front gate as this is probably the highlight of their day. A bone can change all that.

    A large raw bone will keep a dog content for hours. If you are in the habit of leaving your dog unattended during the day, leave a raw bone out for him occasionally. This will delay the onset of boredom and may help to stop the dog barking during your absence. This works even better if the dog is locked in a small comfortable room, such as a laundry at the same time, as the joy of gobbling up the bone will transfer to the fact that he is locked up in his own special room.

    The best type of bones to feed are the softer types. The soft brisket bones are excellent, knuckle bones are good and so are the large marrow bones. Raw bones are far preferable to cooked, as raw bones can be digested a lot more easily.

    By comparison, the wrong types of bones can certainly cause problems. Bones such as chop bones, ‘T-Bones’, chicken bones and fish bones should never be fed. These bones have a dangerous tendency to splinter into sharp fragments which, when swallowed, can perforate the dog’s bowel, with life threatening consequences.

    When a dog crushes a bone it can also wedge inside the dog’s mouth. They often wedge transversely between the teeth on the left and those on the right side of the mouth or they can lodge over a molar tooth where they become stuck like a bulldog clip.

    Dogs witha bone lodged in their mouth are most unhappy. They paw frantically at their mouth, they drool excessively and if the bone is stuck for several hours before it is detected, they develop breath that smells worse than a kilogram of decayed prawns. Bones lodged inside the mouth can sometimes be removed by levering the bone out with a blunt instrument such as the rounded metal handle of a strudy dessert spoon. However this can be very difficult and dangerous as the dog may be so frantic that it will try to bite. The best solution is a quick trip to the veterinarian.

    Constipation is often caused by feeding excess amounts of bone to a dog. The bone fragments tend to cement the dog’s droppings together and the resultant lumps are so hard that they cannot be passed. This problem is especially common with Bull Terriers, Staffordshire Bull Terriers and similar breeds with powerful jaws as they are easily able to crush a whole bone and to consume it in a matter of seconds where a dog with a less powerful jaw will take several days. It is not difficult to tell whether your dog is coping with the bones you are giving him. After your pooch has gobbled a bone, examine his droppings over the next few days. I he has difficulty in passing his motions, if his motions are excessively hard and dry, or if they contain visible fragments of bone, then he consumes the bone too quickly and does not chew them sufficiently. In this case, either eliminate bones from his diet, or give him bones much less frequently and when you do, give a smaller quantity and select bones that are a softer type.

    If, a day or so after feeding your dog a bone, your dog appears to be straining excessively without passing any motions, then a visit to your vet is indicated immediately as serious constipation could have resulted. Many a Bull Terrier has required emergency abdominal surgery to remove a huge amount of impacted faeces from the lower bowel because too many bones have been fed.

    When you give your dog a bone, remove uneaten remains after 24 hours because they are likely to become fly-blown. If left to ‘mature’ in the sun, the bone will harbour numerous dangerous bacteria which would cause a bowel infection if the dog were to swallow them.

    For further information please contact an Animal Control Officer on (07) 4783 9800 or your local vet.

  • Guard Dogs

    Owners may keep Guard Dogs subject to a number of conditions. An application and associated fee apply to guard dogs kept at or on land/premises within the Shire per site. In addition the applicable registration fee also applies. See Council's fees and charges for current fees.

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    Overview

    Owners may keep Guard Dogs subject to a number of conditions.

    Details 

    The occupier of land on which a guard dog is to be kept must:

    1. Display conspicuously at all times on each entrance into the property on which the dog is kept, a notice in black lettering on a white background, not less than 50mm in height and readily legible with the words “BEWARE-DANGEROUS GUARD DOG”;
    2. Ensure that the dog is effectively contained on the allotment;
    3. Demonstrate the keeper can exercise effective control over the dog;
    4. Provide a mechanism whereby safe public access is provided for persons whose occupation requires entry on to the property to perform statutory duties or community functions;
    5. Demonstrate an understanding of the responsibility of keeping a guard dog and a capacity to exercise appropriate control over such animal.

    Fees

    An application and associated fee apply to guard dogs kept at or on land/premises within the Shire per site.  In addition the applicable registration fee also applies.  See Council’s fees and charges for current fees.     

     

    Who to Contact

    For more information of the keeping of a guard dog please contact Council’s Customer Service Centre on (07) 4783 9800 or email

     

     

  • Obedience Training

    Basic obedience training is one of the basics of pet care. Dogs which have been given even the most elementary of obedience lessons make much better pets for several good reasons.

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    Overview

    Basic obedience training is one of the basics of pet care. Dogs which have been given even the most elementary of obedience lessons make much better pets for several good reasons.

    Details

    Dogs are, by nature a pack animal or an animal that prefers to live in a social group and for a responsibly owned dog the dog’s human family is the social group or pack.  The process of obedience training gently reinforces in the dog the fact the dog’s owner is “Top Dog” and the dog is a lesser member of the family “pack”.  In addition, obedience training is a gentle means of giving a pup or dog the guidance it needs to prevent the development of unacceptable behaviour.  In a pack of wild dogs, it is quite natural for a puppy to be disciplined by the pack leader.  The puppy learns to respect the leader, and by observing and copying its actions, the puppy learns to become an integrated member of the dog pack.  In a human family situation, if a pup is allowed to grow up with no such guidance, it can develop unacceptable behavioural patterns, as it has never been told the difference between right and wrong by its owners.  Such pups grown into unruly and unmanageable animals and are usually very unpopular.  Their owners usually blame the dog for its bad behaviour when the owners themselves are at fault for not giving the pup the guidance it needed.  The easiest way to give a dog such guidance is to obedience train the dog.  Obedience training is an excellent way of gently putting a dog in its place. It is a constructive, progressive process which is good fun for both dog and owner.  Another real advantage of obedience training is that the dog is taught to behave in the presence of other dogs and other humans that the dog has never met before.  This practice is one of the best means of socialising a dog to its environment.  It does wonders to improve the self-confidence of nervous dogs and the demeanour of aggressive dogs.

    Obedience Training Using the “Bad Dog-Good Dog” Technique

    The key to making a dog do something that you desire is to make the dog enjoy doing it.  Thus the key to quick obedience training is to “ham it up” and use gushing, liberal praise whenever the dog does anything correct and short, sharp discipline if the dog does something incorrect during the training session.  Any discipline used should be followed by praise as soon as the dog stops the incorrect action and performs the desired command response instead.  In addition, correction for inappropriate actions must come immediately the action is performed, not several seconds later.  The temperament of your dog will dictate the type of guidance and correction needed.  Boisterous dogs need a firm approach while timid dogs respond better to encouragement.  However, it is important to distinguish between confusion and disobedience and react to the first with reassurance and encouragement and to the second with firm discipline.  While doing this you should develop totally different tones in your voice for praise and for chastisement.  To make all this easier for your dog try to develop a series of verbal commands which are used with a series of hand signals.  Always be consistent by using the same verbal commands and associated hand signals together for the same action that you require the dog to perform.  For instance do not ask a dog to lay down by saying “DOWN” one moment and “LAY” the next.  If you use exact repetition and a consistent, non-varying approach to each situation, the dog will begin to understand the actions that evoke a pleasant response and those that evoke an unpleasant response. To avoid confusion, the dog must get the same response to any specific reoccurring situation.

    Equipment Necessary

    The only equipment that is necessary for correct dog training is a leather or cloth lead not less than 1.2 metres long, a check chain collar and a large enough area to train in. Correct installation of the collar is imperative. With the dog on your left side, the chain of the collar should travel in a counter-clockwise direction around the dog’s neck. When installed in such a manner the collar will hang loosely unless the lead is tugged when the collar will tighten briefly to pull the dog into position and will then release. The correct use of a check chain does no harm to the dog.  It is important that your dog is always worked on a loose lead so that the lead can be used for correction when it is needed. This promotes a comfortable situation when the dog is following your lead but an uncomfortable situation if you and your dog are drifting apart.  In the initial learning phase of training, work with your dog for at least 10 minutes each day, or twice a day if possible.  Constantly revise and repeat procedures many times over to reinforce in your dog the actions you require.  There are several ways of having your dog obedience trained.  You can do it yourself at home by using a good book, of which there are several on the market.  Alternatively, you can attend the obedience classes provided by many local obedience dog clubs.  Basic obedience training is the key to having a well behaved pooch.  Once achieved, the dog is more controllable, more dependable and happier in itself as it has a better idea what is expected of it.  The effort is small but the benefits last a life-time.

    Who to contact

    For any further information on dog obedience contact Council’s Customer Service Centre on (07) 4783 9800 or email

     

  • Preventing Roaming

    Dogs that are allowed to roam the street are at danger - danger to themselves and to the public. In fact dogs which are allowed to roam the streets usually have a short lifespan because they are often seriously maimed or killed by cars, are frequently baited because of the nuisance they cause to neighbours [...]

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    Dogs that are allowed to roam the street are at danger – danger to themselves and to the public. In fact dogs which are allowed to roam the streets usually have a short lifespan because they are often seriously maimed or killed by cars, are frequently baited because of the nuisance they cause to neighbours and they often roam so far that they become lost or stolen and are never seen again.

    There are a number of ways to prevent your dog from roaming the streets. The easiest and most obvious solution is to construct a fence that is secure enough to keep your dog on your own property and out of your neighbour’s. In fact a simple rule of dog ownership is that if you have a dog you must have a fence.

    Fencing

    The style of fence is very important and it must be designed safetly so that the dog cannot become trapped by the fence. Many dogs are excellent jumpers and climbers and even a three metre high fence can be ineffective to contain them.

    In such cases, the cheapest and most effective means of preventing escape is to construct a ‘lean-to’ section, inclined inwards, on top of the fence in a similar fashion to the security fences that surround factories. The lean-to prevents dogs from climbing over the fence and also presents a visual barrier to dogs that can jump over high fences. This is far easier and cheaper to construct than placing another vertical section on top of the existing fence – which is still likely to be scaled by some dogs.

    For dogs which dig, a narrow concrete seam under the fence in combination with a tension wire an inch or two about the ground is very effective. Concrete is cheap, and a bag of cement costing a few dollars will fix a lot of fencing.

    Be especially careful if you have a picket fence around your property. Such fences have caused horrendous wounds to the legs of dogs that have attempted to jump over them and have caught their legs between the pickets. A solid wooden fence is much safer.

    People in rented accommodation have an added problem. Understandably, they are reluctant to pay to construct a fence on a property they do not own. However they do have a responsibility to prevent their dog being injured on the street, or becoming a nuisance to neighbours.

    Fortunately there are two easy and inexpensive solutions. The first is to construct a small pen or run for the dog out of chain wire so the dog is confined safely. The run should include shelter from the sun and rain and, of course, watering and feeding facilities.

    Running Leads

    The second, though not ideal method, is to construct a running lead. This is a strong wire secured a metre or two above the ground between two strong posts. The dog’s lead is attached to this in such a fashion that it can easily slip back and forth along the wire. It is necessary to have some form of limiting device at either end of the wire so that the dog cannot move around the securing posts and become entangled. An even better version is to have the lead attached not to two posts but to two pegs driven into the ground either end of the wire so that the dog cannot get the lead tangled.

    It is very poor practice to secure a dog to a chain attached to a single post. The dog’s freedom of movement is severely restricted and the dog is very likely to tie itself in knots. Almost invariably, dogs confined in such fashion turn into problem barkers because of the stress involved with the constant restriction.

    Training

    You can train a dog not to jump fences but this takes time. If you are present when your dog jumps the fence then simple discipline is often effective. Regretfully, most dog owners think that discipline means belting the dog with a rolled newspaper. This is totally inappropriate for a fence jumper, unless you just happen to be standing beside the dog with the rolled newspaper at the very moment the dog is attempting to jump the fence.

    Once Rover has jumped over the fence and is running free, it is a ridiculous practice to call him to you and then thrash him with a newspaper or bare hand. The dog associates the discipline it receives with the last thing it did – which in this case was to come to you in response to your command.

    Do not be surprised when Rover jumps the fence again, as he certainly will, and then refuses to come when you call him.

    The “Bad Dog-Good Dog” Technique

    Discipline needs to come before the dog has vaulted the fence. Keep a wary eye on him from a window and use voice discipline when he approaches the fence with intent to jump. Bellow “No” out of the window like a bull with a bellyache.

    Then call the dog to you in a firm but pleasant voice and, when the dog obeys this command, praise it enthusiastically. This positive response makes the message clearer to the dog than a chastisement alone. Done often enough, it is possible to condition a dog to come to you for a pat instead of jumping a fence.

    Another interesting technique that works in some circumstances is to get the fence to discipline the dog. For this you need a garden hose.

    Attach the hose to the fence where the dog is most likely to jump. Observe the dog closely and, when it approaches the fence, turn on the hose. The dog will associate the discipline with the fence and not with you. Follow this by calling the dog to you for a pat, as with the previous technique.

    Desexing

    It is often very useful to have a problem dog desexed if it is regularly roaming the suburbs. Male dogs will roam looking for sexually active females, especially if the dog can detect the scent of a female in the neighbourhood. Castration is quite effective in preventing roaming if this is the reason for the dog’s wanderlust.

    For further information on preventing roaming, please contact the Animal Control Officer on (07) 4783 9800 or your local vet.

  • Prohibited Breeds

    Council's local laws prohibit the keeping of identified aggressive breeds of dogs including the pit bull terrier.

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    Council’s new local laws, introduced on 1 July 2012, have prohibited the keeping of specific breeds of dogs anywhere within the Shire.    

    These breeds include:

    1. Dogo argentino;
    2. Fila brasileiro;
    3. Japanese tosa;
    4. American Pit Bull Terrier or Pit Bull Terrier; and
    5. Perro de Presa Canario or Presa Canario

    For more information on prohibited animals please refer to Council’s Subordinate Local Law No. 2 (Animal Management) 2012.

    Penalties apply for keeping the above prohibited animals. 

    Further information

    If you require any further information please call Council’s Customer Service Centre on 07 4783 9800 or email

  • Responsible Ownership

    Having pets is a basic right for Burdekin residents and one of the great joys of our community, but everyone who owns an animal must be aware of the responsibility it brings as well as the community's expectations about responsible pet management.Owning a pet is great fun, but it does come with responsibility. Much of being a responsible pet owner is understanding your pet's needs and being aware of your responsibilities to the community.

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    Overview

    Having pets is a basic right for Burdekin residents and one of the great joys of our community, but everyone who owns an animal must be aware of the responsibility it brings as well as the community’s expectations about responsible pet management.Owning a pet is great fun, but it does come with responsibility. Much of being a responsible pet owner is understanding your pet’s needs and being aware of your responsibilities to the community.

    Details

    Dog owners should do a few simple things to keep their pets out of trouble and their neighbours happy:-

    • Make sure your dog is properly fenced in at home with an adequate sized fence and gate.  Also make sure the fence is low enough your dog can’t dig under, strong enough your dog can’t push it over and hole proof so that your dog can’t escape or attack people through it;  
    • Buy your dog a good leash no longer than two metres long and USE it when outside your property;
    • DON’T allow your dog to wander. Roaming dogs are at risk of being seized by the local Council Compliance Officer;
    • Train them not to bark excessively;
    • Stop them from being aggressive so that your pet doesn’t hurt other animals or people;
    • Clean up after your dog, especially in public areas (parks, etc) using a plastic or paper bag. Remember, you are legally required to clean up after your pet;
    • Register your dog within 14 days of ownership and make sure it wears its tag at all times. An attached name-tag with your address is always helpful.;
    • Inform Council of any changes to your registration details within 7 days;
    • Any dogs or cat born after 1st July 2010 must be microchipped by 12 weeks of age.  Anyone who supplies (this includes sell, give or exchange) an animal is responsible for the microchipping;
    • Vaccinate your dog by consulting your local veterinarian; and
    • A well exercised dog makes a contented pet, so responsible pet owners need to make time to regularly exercise their animals.

    A DOG OWNER WHO DOES NOT FOLLOW THESE SIMPLE REGULATIONS CAN BE FINED ON THE SPOT OR HAVE THEIR DOG IMPOUNDED.

    Who to contact

    For more information please contact Council’s Customer Service Centre on (07) 4783 9800 or email

     

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