Pets are part of the famiy in 63% of the 7.5 million households in Australia. (Source: RSPCA) Owning and caring for a pet comes with responsibility to the animal, your family and the community.  As well as feeding and exercising your dog you have a responsiblity to ensure it doesn’t cause a problem to others.

Councils each year deal with thousands of complaints in relation to dogs that bark, wander, are lost and those that attack or act aggressive.  Many of these problems could be addressed by being a repsonsible owner.

As the owner you should:
– train your dog;
– walk it on a lead;
– socialise it with other dogs;
– pick up after it when you take it for a walk (always carry a bag); and
– listen and act when neighbours tell you it barks or howls when you are away.

The information provided here will help you with caring for your pet, making you aware of your responsiblities as well as Council’s potential involvement in animal management issues.

Barking Dogs

All dogs bark, but some barking dogs become a real neighbourhood nuisance.

All dogs bark – barking is natural. Unfortunately , if not addressed it can cause problems with your neighbours.

Barking dogs is the most common animal behaviour problem Council is asked to investigate. Ongoing barking is often a symptom of another problem, and taking time to understand what makes dogs bark – especially your pet or other dogs in your neighbourhood – is the first step towards solving this problem, both for the dog involved and your neighbours.  If your neighbours talk to you about your dog barking ask questions so that you can determine the best way to work with your dog to reduce the barking.

Dogs bark because they are:

  • lonely
  • separated from an owner
  • bored
  • seeking attention
  • anxious
  • protecting their property

and some breeds have a reputation for barking.

Techniques to control barking:

  • Walk your dog to relieve boredom
  • Provide stimulants such as balls and chew toys
  • Leave a radio on or leave one of your old shoes
  • Give your dog a bone when you leave the house
  • Construct a fence designed to restrict your dog’s vision
  • Obedience training and discipline

Scolding your dog for barking will still answer its need for attention.  This will teach the dog that the more it barks, the more attention it will receive, even if this is unpleasant.  However there is a range of simple, effective solutions which may stop your dog barking.

Training to prevent barking:

Option 1 – preventing barking when you are at home

When you’re at home the ‘bad dog – good dog’ technique can be used.

  • To train a puppy, place it in a comfortable room. When it barks, walk quietly to the closed door and sternly tell it to be quiet. Do not open the door. The pup will usually stop barking at the sound of your voice.
  • Wait fifteen to twenty seconds and if it does not bark again, open the door and praise and cuddle the dog. This is not a reward for barking but for being quiet as a result of your command and still gives the dog the attention it wants.
  • If you observe that your dog is on the verge of barking, a firm reprimand in a stern voice No- Bad Dog should prevent this.
  • Now, using a friendly tone, you should command the dog to Come, Sit and Stay. Reward it for obeying. This contrast between reprimand and reward gives the dog a clear message about the effects of its good and bad behaviour.

Option 2 – preventing barking when you are away

When you’re not at home dogs often bark because of a combination of social isolation and boredom. The solution can be to make your dog happy and relaxed by confining it to a small, comfortable room – a ‘den’.

Your laundry, bathroom or any small room would be suitable. You must make the dog happy about being confined to this room while you are out, but balance this with extra exercise when you return home.

  • Make the room comfortable – not too hot, not in direct sun and with soft bedding provided.
  • Place the dog’s water bowl inside its den and nowhere else – so that even when you are at home, it has to go to its den voluntarily for a drink.
  • The most important step is to lock the dog in its den for 15 minutes whenever you feed it. The dog then will associate being confined with the happiness and contentment of being fed. Leave the dog in the den for 15 minutes, then release and praise it.
  • When you leave for work, lock the dog in the den and give it food to make it happy. A large bone will help do this and keep the dog occupied for some time. The dog will remain quiet because it is happy.

Excessive Barking:

Council will investigate barking complaints. Barking is considered excessive if it occurs:

  • 7am-10pm no more than six minutes of noise in any hour
  • 10pm-7am no more than three minutes of noise in any 30-minute period

My Neighbour’s dog barks – what can I do?

Talk to your neighbour as soon as the problem arises. They may not be aware that their dog is barking or that their dog’s barking is bothering you.

Give your neighbour information and if the barking persists after a week or two, speak with your neighbour again to provide feedback.

If your neighbour is unapproachable, or does not agree that a problem exists, you should contact Council for further advice.

Council investigation

Investigations into barking dog complaints takes time and Council needs the assistance of the affected person each step of the way. Without this assistance Council may be limited n what action can be taken.

Prior to lodging a request with Council you can use the Resident’s advice letter – drop it in the letterbox at the address where the barking dog resides.  It’s anonymous and may make the owner aware of the problem.

If there is no improvement after a week contact Council with all of the relevant details. You will be sent a letter and asked to keep a diary of the noise.  This helps Council to understand the extent of the problem so it must be filled in accurately.   The owner is also notified of the problem and requested to act to prevent the barking.

If the problem continues Council officers will have to listen and time the barking to determine if it meets the excessive barking guidelines detailed above.  Council must be able to see the dog barking so it can be described and verified as the problem dog.

The information provided by the caller is a very important part of the evidence of a problem and if the owner fails to act and Council takes legal action the support of the affected person/s will be necessary.

As the owner of a dog that is accused of causing a barking nuisance your assistance in working with Council is vital.  Failure to comply may lead to fines, legal action or removal of your dog.

Council staff can help you with barking problems in the community so that you do not have to suffer the nuisance caused by dogs that make too much noise.

Further information

To report a barking dog…

Please contact the Customer Service Centre using the Online Contact Form.

You can also contact the Customer Service Centre using one of the following methods.

Customer Service Centre

Location
Google Map
145 Young Street,
Ayr Qld 4807
Postal AddressPO Box 974
Ayr Qld 4807
Opening hours8am – 5pm, Monday to Friday (except Public Holidays)
Phone
Call
(07) 4783 9800 – Business hours
(07) 4783 9800 – After hours (the same number)
Fax(07) 4783 9999
Email
OnlineUse the Online Contact Form

Building Certification and Plumbing Officers

Early OpeningPlease phone (07) 4783 9942 if you need to access the Building and Plumbing Department between 7am – 8am, Monday to Friday.

Media Enquiries

For all media enquiries please email

Compliments and Complaints

The Burdekin Shire Council is committed to an open and friendly relationship with members of our community. Whether you’re telling us what we do well, or how we can improve, your feedback is important to us.If you would like to provide a compliment or complaint regarding actions or decisions made by Council, or by one of our councillors or officers, please visit the
> Complaints, compliments and suggestions page.

Privacy Notice

We will only use personal information provided in your email to address the subject matter of your email. This may involve passing on your email to other areas within the council. We will not disclose your personal information to other government agencies, organisations or anyone else unless one of the following applies:

  • you consented to the disclosure
  • you would have a reasonable expectation that your personal information would be disclosed
  • it is required or authorised by law
  • it will prevent or lessen a serious threat to somebody’s life or health; and
  • the disclosure is reasonably necessary for a law enforcement activity.

Your email address details will not be added to a mailing list. Email messages may be monitored by our information technology staff for system trouble-shooting and maintenance purposes.

 

Dangerous and Menacing Dogs

Council may declare your dog 'dangerous' if it has attacked a person or animal, or repeatedly threatened to attack, or menacing if they have caused fear.

Council may declare your dog ‘dangerous’ or ‘menacing’ if it has attacked a person or animal, or threatened to attack and caused fear. The Animal Management (Cats and Dogs) Act 2008 provides Council with the ability to categorise dogs based on the severity of an attack.
A serious attack, causing bodily harm or fear allows the dog to be declared dangerous.  A dog can be declared menacing if the attack or fear is not considered serious.  If a Council Officer is of the opinion that the dog due to previous behaviour is likely to attack or cause fear then the dog can also be declared.

Process for Declaring a Dog Dangerous or Menacing

Council undertakes an investigation following the receival of a complaint of an incident or attack.  The owner of the dog allegedly involved in the incident is asked to provide a statement as are any witnesses and the complainant.  Once the investigation is complete a decision is made whether to declare the dog dangerous, menacing or not to declare the dog at all.

If Council proposes to declare the dog the owner then receives a notice advising of the proposal and offering them an opportuinty to respond in writing.

If Council continues with the declaration an Information Notice is issued and the owner will have 21 days to comply with all of the conditions, including paying a higher registration fee for each declared dog.

During this time the owner of the dog may apply for an Internal Review of the decision to declare the dog.  The application form is provided with the Information Notice and the owner has 14 days to lodge the review.  It is important to note that lodging the review does not stop the requirement to comply with the conditions.

When a decision is made on the Internal Review applciation a Review Notice is issued to the owner advising of the outcome.  If the owner is not happy with the outcome they can lodge an External Review through Queensland Civil and Administrative Tribunal.

Conditions for Keeping Dangerous or Menacing Dogs

Once your dog is declared either dangerous or menacing strict conditions are imposed.  A number of conditions are imposed including:

  • The dog must be kept witihn an enclosure that meets strict requriements including construction materials, height requriements based on weight of the dog, self closing and self latching gates and secure access to the front door for any visitor.
  • Erect signs on your property, which say ‘Declared Dangerous Dog’ or ‘Declared menacing Dog’;
  • Leash your dog at all times when outside your property (there are no exceptions) and if the dog ahs been declared dangerous it is also to be muzzled to prevent biting;
  • Ensure your dog is securely held by means of a collar and leash by a person over 16 years of age (only one dog to be held by this person at one time);
  • A dangerous dog can also not be allowed to breed and must be desexed;
  • The dog is not to be relocated or given away without notifying Council.

These are just some of the conditions, a full list is available from the Additional Information section on this page.

Penalties

If the owner of a declared dangerous dog or declared menacing dog does not comply with the conditions Council may either:

  • Issue fines for over $800
  • Seize the dog; or
  • Commence legal action (maximum penalty above $35000)

Registration Fees

The registration fees for declared dogs are significantly higher than for general registration.  The fees in 2018-2019 are:

Dangerous Dog (initial registration):  $368

Dangerous Dog annual renewal:          $283
Menacing Dog (initial registration):    $356

Menacing Dog annual renewal (Entire): $272

Menacing Dog annual renewal (Desexed): $209

 

For further information:

Please contact the Customer Service Centre using the Online Contact Form.

You can also contact the Customer Service Centre using one of the following methods.

Customer Service Centre

Location
Google Map
145 Young Street,
Ayr Qld 4807
Postal AddressPO Box 974
Ayr Qld 4807
Opening hours8am – 5pm, Monday to Friday (except Public Holidays)
Phone
Call
(07) 4783 9800 – Business hours
(07) 4783 9800 – After hours (the same number)
Fax(07) 4783 9999
Email
OnlineUse the Online Contact Form

Building Certification and Plumbing Officers

Early OpeningPlease phone (07) 4783 9942 if you need to access the Building and Plumbing Department between 7am – 8am, Monday to Friday.

Media Enquiries

For all media enquiries please email

Compliments and Complaints

The Burdekin Shire Council is committed to an open and friendly relationship with members of our community. Whether you’re telling us what we do well, or how we can improve, your feedback is important to us.If you would like to provide a compliment or complaint regarding actions or decisions made by Council, or by one of our councillors or officers, please visit the
> Complaints, compliments and suggestions page.

Privacy Notice

We will only use personal information provided in your email to address the subject matter of your email. This may involve passing on your email to other areas within the council. We will not disclose your personal information to other government agencies, organisations or anyone else unless one of the following applies:

  • you consented to the disclosure
  • you would have a reasonable expectation that your personal information would be disclosed
  • it is required or authorised by law
  • it will prevent or lessen a serious threat to somebody’s life or health; and
  • the disclosure is reasonably necessary for a law enforcement activity.

Your email address details will not be added to a mailing list. Email messages may be monitored by our information technology staff for system trouble-shooting and maintenance purposes.

Dog Attacks

Being bitten or attacked by a dog can produce serious physical, psychological and emotional effects, not only for the person who is attacked but also for the owner of the attacking dog. Even if the victim is not bitten, the threat of the attack can cause lasting trauma. Think how you would feel if you were the victim?

Overview

Being bitten or attacked by a dog can produce serious physical, psychological and emotional effects, not only for the person who is attacked but also for the owner of the attacking dog.  Even if the victim is not bitten, the threat of the attack can cause lasting trauma. How  would you feel if you were the victim?

Responsibility

Aggressive dogs are often a sign of irresponsible ownership.  Pet owners are always responsible and legally liable for the actions of their animals.  Aggressive animals have no place in public areas unless under close and direct supervision.

Under the Animal Management (Cats and Dogs) Act 2008 dogs that act aggressively and cause fear as well as those that attack and cause injury or death may be declared menacing or dangerous. If the declaration proceeds the declared dog must be kept under strict conditions and higher registration fees will also apply.

Tips

Here are some tips for responsible ownership of your dog and to reduce the chances of your dog being in a situation where it might become aggressive:-

  • Always supervise children around dogs. Dog play can become rough and may sometimes result in a bite. Constantly monitor your children when a dog is around and never leave babies or young children alone with a dog;
  • Keep children away from a dog if it is sleeping, feeding (especially chewing a bone) or if recovering from an illness or injury;
  • Always check to see that your fencing or dog enclosure is secure.  Keeping your dog confined will greatly lessen the risk to others in the community; and
  • Always use a leash when walking your dog in public.

If attacked….

If you or your pet are unfortunate enough to be attacked or bitten by an aggressive you should report the following details to Council immediately:-

  • Your name and address;
  • The date, time and location of the attack;
  • A full description of the dog (eg. colour, breed, size);
  • The identity and address of the owner of the dog (if possible).

Following an investigation if the dog and it’s owner have been identified Council may declare the dog as dangerous or menacing, issue fines and/or seize the dog.

Fees

Currenty the annual registration fee for a declared dog is:

Dangerous:  $283

Menacing: $209 (if desexed) or $272 (if entire)

For further information, please contact Council’s Customer Service Centre on (07) 4783 9800 or email

Family with a pet dog

Dog Breeders and Selling dogs

Breeders must register with the state government if they are selling or giving away dogs born on or after 26 May 2017.

The Queensland Government has introduced laws to promote responsible dog breeding. The legislation came into effect  26 May 2017 and applies only to dogs born on or after this date.

The laws require all persons giving away, supplying, selling or advertising dogs or puppies to have a Supply Number that identifies the Registered Breeder of that dog.

Breeding dogs

From 26 May 2017 you can register as a puppy breeder by following the link below to the Queensland Dog Breeder Register. There is no cost to register as a breeder.

A Breeder is someone who has a female dog with a litter. Any person who is a Breeder must have a supply number, unless they qualify for an exemption.

The laws apply to people who are professional breeders, occasional breeders and to people who are not making money from the dogs or puppies supplied. The laws apply to occasional, accidental or planned litters.

A Breeder must be registered and have a supply number within 28 days of the first litter being born. A Breeder only needs to register once, however it is to be renewed each year. Currently there is no fee to register.

You must not give away, supply, sell or advertise a dog or puppy without a Supply Number that identifies the Breeder or provides an Exemption. The Supply Number must be displayed whenever a dog or puppy is advertised for give-away, supply or sale.  All suppliers, including pet shops, must display the Supply Number when selling, advertising or otherwise supplying dogs or puppies.

Supply Numbers can be obtained by registering on the new Queensland Dog Breeder Register. Alternatively, a Supply Number may also be a membership or permit number from an organisation or local government that accredits dog breeders – and that has been approved by the Minister as an “approved entity”.

The supply number will also be required information when the puppy is microchipped.

Please use this link to the Queensland Dog Breeder Register

Buying or getting a dog

You are encouraged to only buy or receive dogs and puppies that have a Supply Number identifying the Breeder.

The Supply numbers and Queensland Dog Breeder Register allow the origin of dogs and puppies to be traced.

You will be able to check that the Breeder is registered and may contact them directly regarding the dog.

When you get a dog or puppy:

  • Look for a supply number displayed in the advertisement or where the dog or puppy is being offered for sale.
  • Check the online register to confirm the Supply Number is valid and identifies the Breeder
  • Contact the Breeder if you have questions about where the dog or puppy has originated
  • Make sure you receive the microchip transfer of ownership papers with the dog or puppy at the time of purchase and that these papers include a valid Supply Number.

Use this link to check the Supply number or if a registered breeder.

Exemptions

In certain circumstances an application can be made for a Breeder Exemption Number.

These include:

  1. You are a primary producer breeding working dogs who wishes to give away, supply, advertise or sell the dog to a person who:
    • Is not a primary producer; or
    • Is not going to keep the dog as a working dog;

OR

  1. You are a person who:
    • Is the owner of, or responsible person for, the dog; and
    • You did not breed the dog; and
    • You do not conduct a business activity that includes the supply of dogs

To lodge a complaint

Please use this link to lodge a complaint in relation to a dog breeder.

For more information

Please call Biosecurity Queensland on 13 25 23 or visit their website.

Fact Sheets

Please refer to the following fact sheets for further information.

Preventing Roaming

There are a number of ways to prevent your dog from roaming the streets. The easiest and most obvious solution is to construct a fence that is secure enough to keep your dog on your own property and out of your neighbour's. In fact a simple rule of dog ownership is that if you have [...]

There are a number of ways to prevent your dog from roaming the streets. The easiest and most obvious solution is to construct a fence that is secure enough to keep your dog on your own property and out of your neighbour’s. In fact a simple rule of dog ownership is that if you have a dog you must have a fence.

Fencing

The style of fence is very important and it must be designed safetly so that the dog cannot become trapped by the fence. Many dogs are excellent jumpers and climbers and even a three metre high fence can be ineffective to contain them.

In such cases, the cheapest and most effective means of preventing escape is to construct a ‘lean-to’ section, inclined inwards, on top of the fence in a similar fashion to the security fences that surround factories. The lean-to prevents dogs from climbing over the fence and also presents a visual barrier to dogs that can jump over high fences. This is far easier and cheaper to construct than placing another vertical section on top of the existing fence – which is still likely to be scaled by some dogs.

For dogs which dig, a narrow concrete seam under the fence in combination with a tension wire an inch or two about the ground is very effective. Concrete is cheap, and a bag of cement costing a few dollars will fix a lot of fencing.

Be especially careful if you have a picket fence around your property. Such fences have caused horrendous wounds to the legs of dogs that have attempted to jump over them and have caught their legs between the pickets. A solid wooden fence is much safer.

People in rented accommodation have an added problem. Understandably, they are reluctant to pay to construct a fence on a property they do not own. However they do have a responsibility to prevent their dog being injured on the street, or becoming a nuisance to neighbours.  There is an inexpensive solution which is to construct a small pen or enclosure for the dog out of chain wire so the dog is confined safely.  The pen should include shelter from the sun and rain and, of course, watering and feeding facilities.

Training

You can train a dog not to jump fences but this takes time. If you are present when your dog jumps the fence then simple discipline is often effective.

Once Rover has jumped over the fence and is running free, it is a ridiculous practice to call him to you and then thrash him with a newspaper or bare hand. The dog associates the discipline it receives with the last thing it did – which in this case was to come to you in response to your command.

Do not be surprised when Rover jumps the fence again, as he certainly will, and then refuses to come when you call him.

The “Bad Dog-Good Dog” Technique

Discipline needs to come before the dog has vaulted the fence. Keep a wary eye on him from a window and use voice discipline when he approaches the fence with intent to jump. Bellow “No” out of the window like a bull with a bellyache.

Then call the dog to you in a firm but pleasant voice and, when the dog obeys this command, praise it enthusiastically. This positive response makes the message clearer to the dog than a chastisement alone. Done often enough, it is possible to condition a dog to come to you for a pat instead of jumping a fence.

Desexing

It is often very useful to have a problem dog desexed if it is regularly roaming the suburbs. Male dogs will roam looking for sexually active females, especially if the dog can detect the scent of a female in the neighbourhood. Castration is quite effective in preventing roaming if this is the reason for the dog’s wanderlust.

For further information on preventing roaming, please contact the Animal Control Officer on (07) 4783 9800 or your local vet.

Prohibited Breeds

Council's local laws prohibit the keeping of identified aggressive breeds of dogs including the pit bull terrier.

Council’s new local laws, introduced on 1 July 2012, have prohibited the keeping of specific breeds of dogs anywhere within the Shire.

These breeds include:

  1. Dogo argentino;
  2. Fila brasileiro;
  3. Japanese tosa;
  4. American Pit Bull Terrier or Pit Bull Terrier; and
  5. Perro de Presa Canario or Presa Canario

For more information on prohibited animals please refer to Council’s Subordinate Local Law No. 2 (Animal Management) 2012.

Penalties apply for keeping the above prohibited animals.

Further information

If you require any further information please call Council’s Customer Service Centre on 07 4783 9800 or email

Responsible Ownership

Having pets is a basic right for Burdekin residents and one of the great joys of our community, but everyone who owns an animal must be aware of the responsibility it brings as well as the community's expectations about responsible pet management.Owning a pet is great fun, but it does come with responsibility. Much of being a responsible pet owner is understanding your pet's needs and being aware of your responsibilities to the community.

Overview

For many people their pets are beloved member s of the family. Each pet has it’s own quirks, fears and needs. Having a pet is a serious responsibility and comes with obligations as well as expectations within the  community.  These obligations and expectations are the basis for responsible pet ownership.

While the information below focuses on dogs in many cases it can be used for other pets.

Details

Dog owners should do a few simple things to keep their pets out of trouble and their neighbours happy:-

  • Make sure your dog is properly fenced in at home with an adequate sized fence and gate.  Also make sure the fence is low enough your dog can’t dig under, strong enough your dog can’t push it over and hole proof so that your dog can’t escape or attack people through it;
  • Ensure that the enclosure also provides shelter from the sun, heat and rain;
  • Buy your dog a good leash no longer than two metres long and USE it when outside your property;
  • DON’T allow your dog to wander. Roaming dogs are a risk to themselves and the community;
  • Train them not to bark excessively;
  • Stop them from being aggressive so that your pet doesn’t hurt other animals or people;
  • Clean up after your dog, especially in public areas (parks, etc) using a bag. Remember, you are legally required to clean up after your pet;
  • Register your dog within 14 days of ownership and make sure it wears its tag at all times. An attached name-tag with your address is always helpful.;
  • Inform Council of any changes to your registration details within 7 days;
  • Any dogs or cat born after 1st July 2010 must be microchipped by 12 weeks of age.  Anyone who supplies (this includes sell, give or exchange) an animal is responsible for the microchipping;
  • Vaccinate your dog by consulting your local veterinarian;
  • When buying a puppy make sure it has been bought from a registered breeder; and
  • A well exercised dog makes a contented pet, so responsible pet owners need to make time to regularly exercise their animals.

Who to contact

For more information please contact Council’s Customer Service Centre on (07) 4783 9800 or email

 

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