What is recovery? How can we recover as an individual and as a community?

Recovery is a complex process. It is not necessarily the same process for everyone, and sometimes it takes a different amount of time.

Planning well ahead of a disaster helps you recover.  And while help is available, be prepared to help yourself, your family, and friends.

Read more about the recovery process and learn what you can do.

This website shows what government resources there are: Queensland Government – Recovery after a Disaster

And here is a handy factsheet on disaster related power outages

The Local Disaster Management Group and its Plan

Each Council must have a Local Disaster Management Group (LDMG). The LDMG is made up of Councillors, Executive Officers, Emergency Services (such as Police, Fire, SES and Health) and other key agencies. All agencies report to the LDMG which is chaired by the local Mayor. The Local Disaster Management Group is your official source of [...]

Each Council must have a Local Disaster Management Group (LDMG). The LDMG is made up of Councillors, Executive Officers, Emergency Services (such as Police, Fire, SES and Health) and other key agencies. All agencies report to the LDMG which is chaired by the local Mayor. The Local Disaster Management Group is your official source of information before, during, and after disasters.

 

What the Local Disaster Management Group Does

The Burdekin LDMG makes decisions based on information from the Bureau of Meteorology’s weather predictions and advice from Emergency Services. Using this information the LDMG helps the community to prevent, prepare, respond and recover from disasters.

The spokesperson is the Chairperson of the LDMG. Read their warnings and alerts at www.facebook.com/BurdekinDCC 

Read the factsheet to learn about the stages of activation the LDMG go through, and what they mean for you

Community Recovery Structure

When a disaster happens, the Local Disaster Management Group (LDMG) 'responds' to the event. Response can include search and rescue operations and damage assessments. It usually lasts a short period of time. Recovery is the next phase and often takes much longer, although response and recovery can happen at simultaneously. Understanding the recovery process helps [...]

When a disaster happens, the Local Disaster Management Group (LDMG) ‘responds’ to the event. Response can include search and rescue operations and damage assessments. It usually lasts a short period of time. Recovery is the next phase and often takes much longer, although response and recovery can happen at simultaneously.

Understanding the recovery process helps you have a realistic view of what to expect after a disaster, both short term and long term.

 

What is recovery?

It is the phase after a disaster that coordinates the effort to restore physical infrastructure in our community as well as the emotional, social, economic and physical wellbeing of people. Everyone’s needs are different as we move from short term to long term recovery.

Recovery time varies for each person, and it is a time to move forward together as a community. For some people, recovery means going ‘back to normal’, while for others, it isn’t possible for things to return to the way they were and means adapting to a ‘new normal’.

Depending on the size and type of disaster, the LDMG may appoint a Local Recovery Coordinator to oversee all aspects of recovery to help the community get back on its feet again as quickly as possible.

Read the recovery factsheet to find out what they five main areas are, and what they focus on short term and long term.

Preparing helps you recover

While we can't avoid disasters, there are things you can do now to help you and your loved ones be prepared, cope better and recover more quickly if an emergency happens. Help is available but be prepared to help yourself, family and friends. Read the factsheet to find out how you can complete these steps: [...]

While we can’t avoid disasters, there are things you can do now to help you and your loved ones be prepared, cope better and recover more quickly if an emergency happens. Help is available but be prepared to help yourself, family and friends.

Read the factsheet to find out how you can complete these steps:

1 – You can prepare mentally

2 – Prepare physically – make a household emergency plan, have an emergency kit, prepare your house, car, boat, and pets

3 – List important numbers. You might like to add your own to the list here

4 – Listen – 92.3 4TOFM, 93.1 HitFM, ABC radio and TV

What to do the next morning

What should you do immediately after a disaster? These few simple steps will help you focus on what you can do. Do not rely on Emergency Services. 1 - Check your family and pets 2 - Listen and look 3 - Check your home 4 - Check your neighbours 5 - Get help if you [...]

What should you do immediately after a disaster? These few simple steps will help you focus on what you can do. Do not rely on Emergency Services.

1 – Check your family and pets

2 – Listen and look

3 – Check your home

4 – Check your neighbours

5 – Get help if you need it

6 – Start your clean up

There’s more information on how to complete these steps here

Asbestos warning

Most homes built before 1990 are likely to have materials that contain asbestos, such as asbestos cement sheeting. Play it safe – if you are unsure or suspect it might be asbestos, assume it is asbestos.

DO NOT ATTEMPT TO CLEAN UP THE ASBESTOS YOURSELF

Don’t move suspected asbestos materials unnecessarily. Check with your insurer regarding your damage and repairs which may include the removal and clean-up of asbestos by a licences asbestos removalist.

Don’t place it on the kerbside or street for collection, as machines picking up waste may damage the asbestos sheeting and spread harmful fibres.

If someone else’s asbestos sheeting is in your yard, keep the sheeting wet if possible and call Council on 4783 9800.

More information: www.asbestosawareness.com.au 

 

Do you have solar panels?

When preparing for a storm, cyclone or flood event, it is important to always follow the manufacturer’s or installer’s shutdown procedures. Shutdown procedures should be located at the inverter and/or on the main switchboard.

It is critical to remember solar modules and their cables should be treated as if they are live.

A general shutdown procedure is as follows:

1-Turn off the inverter AC mains isolator (this is usually found in the meter box)

2 – Turn off the PV array isolator (this is usually found next to the inverter)

3 – If there seems to be a risk that the water level could reach up to the inverters and cables, also arrange to turn off the roof top array isolator (if fitted)

If you are unsure of the shutdown procedure, contact the manufacturer or installer.

For more information: www.ergon.com.au/network/safety/home-safety/solar-power-safety 

 

How you can help yourself recover

Disasters affect everyone differently. Some people recover soon after while others may take a long time to feel like things are 'back to normal'. Try to establish a routine and move forward as quickly as possible and seek help from family and friends to help you get back on your feet.   Psychological and emotional [...]

Disasters affect everyone differently. Some people recover soon after while others may take a long time to feel like things are ‘back to normal’. Try to establish a routine and move forward as quickly as possible and seek help from family and friends to help you get back on your feet.

 

Psychological and emotional recovery

It’s okay to ask for help. Recognise that recovery takes time. You will likely have a range of feelings after a major disaster. Allowing yourself to express your emotions will help with healing. Find out how physical things can help you recover emotionally. 

 

Dealing with insurance

Make sure you photograph everything first!

Before making a claim, read your Product Disclosure Statement and your policy schedule to see if you have a valid claim and that the event is not on the list of exclusions for your policy.

Understand non-insurance and under insurance here

 

Read the recovery factsheet here

Comments are closed.